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Imprint: London, Baldwin & Craddock, 1837
335 x 390 mm., in early outline colour.
A good detailed plan of the city of Brussels. An early edition and state of this map published by the firm of Baldwin and Craddock. With an inset plan of the surrounding environs there are profiles of notable buildings along the bottom.
Stock number:4664.
£ 50.00 ( approx. $US 62.24 )
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Imprint: London, Baldwin & Craddock, c.1844
335 x 390 mm., in early outline colour.
A good detailed plan of the city of Dresden. An early edition and state of this map published by the firm of Baldwin and Craddock. Originally issued in parts, this was first published as an atlas in 1844. It was arranged geographically with the fifty-one town plans at the end. There were to be at least ten other editions up to 1876. ‘Imago Mundi’ 46 pp. 151-67; Wardington sale lot 480.
Stock number:7777.
£ 55.00 ( approx. $US 68.46 )
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Imprint: London, Baldwin & Craddock, 1841
335 x 390 mm., in early outline colour.
A good detailed plan of the city of Hamburg. An early edition and state of this map published by the firm of Baldwin and Craddock. Originally issued in parts, this was first published as an atlas in 1844. It was arranged geographically with the fifty-one town plans at the end. There were to be at least ten other editions up to 1876. ‘Imago Mundi’ 46 pp. 151-67; Wardington sale lot 480.
Stock number:7776.
£ 65.00 ( approx. $US 80.91 )
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Imprint: Leiden, c.1720
29 x 34 cms., in fine condition
This fine detailed map is centred on modern day Astara on the Iran - Azerbaijan border. It was published in van der Aa's magnificent 66 volume 'La Galerie Agreable'. Only 100 copies of this atlas were reputably printed. Koeman I Aa 9 volume 52 no. 10.
Stock number:4149.
£ 125.00 ( approx. $US 155.60 )
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Imprint: Leiden, c.1720
270 x 360 mm., in good condition.
Pierre vander Aa published several works but the most notable is undoubtedly the extremely rare 'La Galerie Agreable du Monde', the Library of Congress example runs to sixty-six volumes! Only 100 copies of this atlas were reputably printed. This view of Saba in Persia is from the 52nd volume. Koeman I Aa 9 vol. 52 no. 8; Shirley 'Atlases in the British Library' T.Aa 5a.
Stock number:4963.
£ 125.00 ( approx. $US 155.60 )
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Imprint: Leiden, c.1720
270 x 350 mm., in good condition.
Pierre vander Aa published several works but the most notable is undoubtedly the extremely rare 'La Galerie Agreable du Monde', the Library of Congress example runs to sixty-six volumes! Only 100 copies of this atlas were reputably printed. This view of Soltanie in Persia is from the 52nd volume. Koeman I Aa 9 vol. 52 no. 7; Shirley 'Atlases in the British Library' T.Aa 5a.
Stock number:4961.
£ 125.00 ( approx. $US 155.60 )
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Imprint: London, 1832
24 x 32.5 cms., early wash colour.
An attractive scene of the famous Chambord Chateau on the Loire. Published by the famous firm of Ackerman and printed by Engelmann. Not located in Abbey.
Stock number:3269.
$US 125.00
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Imprint: London, 1 January 1819
325 x 435 mm., aquatint engraving in superb early wash colour, two small fox marks in lower margin, otherwise in excellent condition with good margins.
This superb aquatint is one of a pair of Richmond printed by Rudolph Ackermann and is taken from near the Duke of Buccleuch property. The engraving is the work of Thomas Sutherland and was from a drawing by John Gendell. Gendall (1790-1865), born near Exeter, displayed early promise as an artist and was sent to Sir John Soane in London. It was through him that he was introduced to Ackermann. No bibliographical reference to be found. Mallalieu (1986).
Stock number:7737.
£ 595.00 ( approx. $US 740.66 )
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Imprint: London, 1765
Edition: First Edition
Binding: Hardback
Folio (320 x 205 mm.), full contemporary calf, TALL PAPER COPY, ribbed spine with ornate gilt compartments, gilt calf title label. With 51 Acts and 'A Table of the Statues ...' passed during the Fourth Session. pp. 928, [18], complete with blank endpapers, in good condition.
The rare first printing of the notorious STAMP ACT of 1765 [5 Geo III Cap.12] issued exactly 250 years ago which brought such indignation from the American Colonies and ultimately was key to the eventual Declaration of Independence and the American Revolution. The Act placed a tax on all legal and commercial almanacs, cards, dice, newspapers, pamphlets and papers in the American Colonies. It was immediately denounced with the now famous phrase "taxation without representation". The British Government soon realised the error of their ways and in the following session repealed the Act. The political damage was however already done.A bound volume of Acts of Parliament of George III for the year 1765. It was 'Printed by Mark Baskett and the Assigns of Roger Baskett'. Further interesting acts included the Quartering Act and a significant Act relating to the Prize for identifying Longitude. The following are of note: 'An Act for the Regulation of His Majesty's Marine Forces while on Shore' [5 Geo III Cap.6]'An Act for punishing Mutiny and Desertion; and for the better Payment of the Army and their Quarters' [5 Geo III Cap.7] and its amendment [5 Geo III Cap.23]An Act for rendering more effectual an Act made in the Twelfth Year of the Reign of Her late Majesty Queen Anne, intituled, 'An Act for providing a publick Reward for such Person or Persons as shall discover the Longitude at Sea, with regard to the making Experiments of Proposals made for discovering the Longitude' [5 Geo III Cap.11], [a further longitude act] [5 Geo III Cap.20]'An Act for more effectually securing and encouraging the Trade of His Majesty's American Dominions; for repealing the Inland Duty on Coffee ... [5 Geo III Cap.45]Church 1054; Howes A285; Sabin 1606.
Stock number:7640.
$US 15000.00
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Imprint: London, 1766
Edition: First Edition
Binding: Hardback
Folio (300 x 195 mm.), pp. 4, (243-4) in good condition.
The rare first printing of the repeal of the notorious STAMP ACT of 1765 [5 Geo III Cap.12] which brought such indignation from the American Colonies and ultimately was key to the eventual Declaration of Independence and the American Revolution. The British government had taken on huge debts to finance the French and Indian War and felt that some of the cost should be born by the colonies. The Act placed a tax on all legal and commercial almanacs, cards, dice, newspapers, pamphlets and papers in the American Colonies. It was immediately denounced with the now famous phrase "taxation without representation". The British Government soon realised the error of their ways and in the following session repealed the Act. The political damage was however already done. The ESTC records just three copies. Church 1060; ESTC N56896.
Stock number:8056.
$US 1795.00
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Imprint: Washington, A. H. Walker, 1871
Edition: First Edition
Binding: Hardback
Large folio (710 x 340 mm.), contemporary half calf with cloth boards, blind ornate panel to upper board containing gilt embossed title. With 675 x 4860 mm. folding chart in 21 sections in full original colour, all backed on linen and folding in to marbled endpapers. Worn, particularly at the folds
Although Adam's published his work in Washington it appears this example was sold by the publisher A. H. Walker in London and Paris. Tooley's Dictionary records a purely biblical chart of 1883. An unusual chart of history illustrated with numerous charts and tables. According to the British Library the first edition was printed in 1871. This example bears the latest date of 1881 in the table. The third edition is noted in 1878. Provenance: Eurobooks 1997 £100. British Library Maps 33.e.32.
Stock number:7694.
£ 195.00 ( approx. $US 242.74 )
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Imprint: London, 1836-[72]
61.5 x 89 cm.Uncoloured chart, with minor creasing along centrefold, and bottom margin.Some age toneing.
Surveyed by Comdr Haines and Assistants. Inset of Aden Anchorage, also 2 insets of the land as seen from the sea.
Stock number:2994.
£ 250.00 ( approx. $US 311.20 )
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Imprint: London, 1927-[54]
117 x 67 cms. In excellent condition.
A magnificently detailed plan of the town and harbour of Falmouth, Cornwall. A large inset takes continues the map to Truro. The survey was carried out by captain J. D. Nares in the Royal Navy ship Endevour, 1923. A note of 'Conspicuous Objects' is at the foot of the title with further tidal information. With a price label of 8 shillings on the verso.
Stock number:3927.
£ 195.00 ( approx. $US 242.74 )
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Imprint: London, Edward J Francis, 1874
Binding: Hardback
Quarto, contemporary publishers cloth with blind panels enclosing a gilt title, gilt title to spine. Bound within large folding map of London in woodcut, 725 x 1840 mm., backed on linen, minor damage at double fold, otherwise in good condition.
A facsimile of the woodcut plan of London attributed to Ralph Agas and first published in 1633. Only three examples are recorded. This is reproduced from the example in the Guildhall Library. Darlington & Howgego (1964) 8.i.
Stock number:7751.
£ 450.00 ( approx. $US 560.16 )
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Imprint: Philadelphia, Robert Aitken, July 1775
Edition: First Edition
Octavo (205 x 130 mm.), lacking wrappers and clearly from a bound volume but with accompanying folding plan of the town Boston, toned as usual otherwise in good condition.
Including the FIRST PRINTED PLAN OF THE POSITIONS AT THE BATTLE OF BUNKER HILL. Extremely rare especially with the accompanying monthly issue of the Pennsylvania Magazine. There were only three magazines published in America between the period 1772 to 1783, the important period leading up to and during the American Revolution. Two were ‘The Royal Magazine’ issued in Boston 1774-75 and ‘The United States Magazine’ published in Philadelphia 1779. The most important however was ‘The Pennsylvania Magazine’ published in Philadelphia between January 1775 and July 1776 by Robert Aitken (1735-1802) and edited by Thomas Paine (1737-1809). The first issue in January 1775 sold six hundred copies and it was for the February issue that Paine was made editor. Through his work within a few months there were fifteen hundred paid subscribers. It was during his stewardship that he wrote and published ‘Common Sense’. He often wrote using the initials ‘A.B.’ or used the pseudonym ‘Atlanticus’. He remained editor until May 1776. It was the only magazine issued in the colonies during this critical period. His most notable contribution in this issue is the FIRST PRINTING of the ‘LIBERTY TREE’ on pages 328 and 39. On 14 August 1765 two effigies were discover in the largest of a group of elm trees at orange and Essex Streets in Boston, now Washington and Essex. They were placed in protest against the Stamp Act imposed by the British. Over the years it became a symbol of liberty and numerous famous prints depict it. A month after Paine published the song in late August 1775 it was defiantly cut down by a group of loyalists led by Job Williams. It had been planted in 1649.Aitken once described how best to get work from Paine when deadlines pressed. He would seat him at a table with a glass and a decanter of brandy “he would never write without that.” “The first glass put him in a train of thinking; Aitken feared the second would disqualify him, or render him untractable; but it only illuminated his intellectual system; and when he had swallowed the third glass, he wrote with great rapidity, intelligence, and precision; and his ideas appeared to flow faster than he could commit them to paper. What he penned from the inspiration of the brandy, was perfectly fit for the press without any alteration, or correction” (Thomas).On pages 334-7 is John Hancock’s ‘A Declaration by the Representatives of the united Colonies of North-America, now met in the General Congress at Philadelphia, setting forth the Causes and Necessity of their taking up Arms’ issued on 6 July 1775. It was the resolution of the Second Continental Congress.At the end of the magazine is an account of the battle of Bunker’s Hill with a list of the number of the dead. The accompanying folding plan of Boston entitled ‘A New and Correct Plan of the Town of Boston and Provincial Camp’ is engraved by Robert Aitken. The June issue of the magazine included a map which bore a legend beneath the title reading ‘NB Charlestown burnt June 17th. 1775 by the Regulars’ but bore no detail on the map. It was published just 2 or 3 days after the battle with little time to record detail on the plate beyond an additional note. It is this next month’s issue which gave to the opportunity to record more. By June 1775 following the battles of Lexington and Concord some 10,000 militia from the colonies had poured in to the region and laid siege to the town of Boston held by the British. George Washington had only just been named Commander in Chief of these forces on 3 July 1775. The inset lower right illustrates General Gage’s position holding Boston Neck with the opposing Provincial Lines near Roxbury. The British Battery on Boston Common is shown on the main map and opposite Charles Town near Corpse Hill by the Ferry point. The Provincial Line extends from Winter Hill on the Mystick River to Cambridge noting five Forts. Ristow describes this map along with that in the issues of June and August as “the earliest revolutionary war maps printed in America”. It was issued before the news had even reached Britain.Individual issues of the magazine are rare and often lack their accompanying maps and plates. A fascinating item of American Revolutionary interest. Provenance: Bill Reese Catalogue 208 item 4. Evans 14380; Jolly ‘Maps of America in Periodicals Before 1800’ no. 267; Mott (1930) ‘A History of American Magazines 1741-1850’; Nebenzahl (1975); 2; Phillips Maps p. 10; Richardson (1931) ‘A History of Early American Magazines 1741-1789’ p. 163; Ristow (1985) p. 41; Thomas (1810) ‘The History of Printing in America’; Wheat & Brun 238.
Stock number:8908.
$US 5950.00
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Imprint: London, Mount, John & Page, Thomas, c.1764
555 x 825 mm., printed on fine thick paper and in very good condition.
This is one of the very few works published by the firm of Mount and Page that was not part of the extensive 'English Pilot' series. It was entitled "A compleat set of new charts on thirty-eight large plates: containing an accurate survey of the coast of Portugal and the Mediterranean Sea". The title page was engraved by J. Larkin and it seems likely on stylistic grounds that the cartouches at least on the individual maps are also by him. NMM 405; Shirley BL M.Alag 1a no. 16.
Stock number:4442.
£ 350.00 ( approx. $US 435.68 )
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Imprint: Augsburg, 1608
545 x 405 mm., in fine condition.
An engraved emblematic double page plate with the family tree of the rulers of Bavaria. A fine view of the town of Heidelberg is at the bottom of the plate. It is from Antonio Albizzi's 'Principum Christianorum Stemmata', a popular work of the day. It was engraved by David Custodis. The family tree of the local Royal and notable family is laid out. Graesse I 58; Shirley G.Albi 1a.
Stock number:4512.
£ 220.00 ( approx. $US 273.86 )
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Imprint: Augsburg, 1608
540 x 390 mm., in fine condition.
An engraved emblematic double page plate with the family tree of the rulers of Lorraine. A view of the town of Blanmond is at the bottom of the plate. It is from Antonio Albizzi's 'Principum Christianorum Stemmata', a popular work of the day. It was engraved by David Custodis. The family tree of the local Royal and notable family is laid out. Graesse I 58; Shirley G.Albi 1a no. 23.
Stock number:4511.
£ 145.00 ( approx. $US 180.50 )
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Imprint: Augsburg, 1608
390 x 250 mm., small 1 cms tear to lower margin not effecting image with old repair, otherwise in fine condition.
An engraved emblematic plate with the arms of Augsburg, Germany, whose Latin name is given as Augusta. A view of the town is at the bottom of the plate. It was published in the town in the 'Principum Christianorum Stemmata' by Antonio Albizzi (1547-1626) of Florence, a popular work of the day. It was engraved by David Custodis. The family tree of the local Royal and notable family is laid out. Graesse I 58; Shirley G.Albi 1a no. 12.
Stock number:4487.
£ 215.00 ( approx. $US 267.63 )
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Imprint: Augsburg, 1608
400 x 245 mm., in fine condition.
An engraved emblematic plate with the arms of Copenhagen, Denmark, whose Latin name is Hafnia. A view of the town is at the bottom of the plate. It was published in 'Principum Christianorum Stemmata' by Antonio Albizzi (1547-1626) of Florence, a popular work of the day. It was engraved by David Custodis. The family tree of the local Royal or notable family is laid out. Graesse I 58; Shirley G.Albi 1a no. 20.
Stock number:4395.
£ 165.00 ( approx. $US 205.39 )
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