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Imprint: London, 1607-[37]
270 x 320 mm., in good condition.
This map of England and Wales engraved by William Hole is derived from that of Gerard Mercator published in 1595. This is from the first fully illustrated edition of Camden's great work 'Britannia'. There were three editions in 1607, 1610 and 1637, this example being from the last. Shirley, R.W. (BI to 1650) no. 280; Skelton 5.
Stock number:6230.
£ 175.00 ( approx. $US 227.74 )
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Imprint: London, 1607-[10]
280 x 350 mm., with fine modern wash colour, in good condition.
This map of Ireland is derived from Baptista Boazio's map of Ireland dating from 1595 of which only a few examples survive. This is the first available printed map following the improved cartography from the first fully illustrated edition of Camden's great work 'Britannia'. There were three editions in 1607, 1610 and 1637, this example being from the second with no text on the verso. The map appears in only the one state. Bonar-Law p. 36-7; Skelton 5.
Stock number:4991.
£ 450.00 ( approx. $US 585.63 )
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Imprint: London, 1607-[10]
280 x 350 mm., in good condition.
This map of Ireland is derived from Baptista Boazio's map of Ireland dating from 1595 of which only a few examples survive. This is the first available printed map following the improved cartography from the first fully illustrated edition of Camden's great work 'Britannia'. There were three editions in 1607, 1610 and 1637, this example being from the second. It appears in only the one state. Bonar-Law p. 36-7; Skelton 5.
Stock number:4983.
£ 450.00 ( approx. $US 585.63 )
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Imprint: London, 1607-[37]
27 x 38 cms., light mark to lower margin and small split nearby, both short of the image
From the first fully illustrated edition of Camden's classic work, the 'Britannia'. An example of the second state from the third edition. Refer to Skelton no. 5
Stock number:3728.
£ 160.00 ( approx. $US 208.22 )
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Imprint: London, Longman, Hurst, Rees, Orme, and Brown, Paternoster Row, 1813
Octavo (220 x 135 mm.), full contemporary calf, rebacked with very ornate gilded ribbed spine, each compartment with ornate ruling and central ornate feature, red calf gilt title label. With typographic title page, Introduction, 'List of the Maps' with advert on the verso pp. xiv, (2), followed by the Dictionary unpaginated, B1-3X2, with 46 maps, those of Scotland and Ireland in two plates. In good condition.
This is the second edition of a work first published by Richard Phillips (1767-1840) under the same title in 1808. Born in London to a Leicestershire family he founded the Leicester Herald in 1792. He was sentenced to 18 months in gaol for selling Thomas Paine's 'Rights of Man' the following year. In 1795, his premised burnt to the ground and with the insurance money he returned to London where he founded 'The Antiquarians' Magazine and Monthly Magazine'. He became Sheriff of London and Middlesex in 1807 and was knighted in 1808. In the same year, he published the 'Topographical Dictionary' and to accompany this he employed Henry Cooper (fl.1804-19) to engrave a series of plates. They are loosely drawn on those of Cary. Wales is described in the list of maps as consisting of two plates when in fact it is just one. Phillips was bankrupted in 1811 and clearly sold the rights in the book to the new publishers Longman, Hurst, Rees and Co. Ownership would change hands again to George Whittaker for later editions. Carroll (1996) no. 64; Chubb (1927) 328; Worms & Baynton-Williams (2011).
Stock number:9225.
£ 295.00 ( approx. $US 383.91 )
Imprint: Philadelphia, Mathew Carey, No. 121, Chesnut Street, 1814
Duodecimo (180 x 110 mm.), full contemporary marbled calf, gilt ruled compartments to spine, red calf gilt title label affixed. With typographic title page, pp. iv, 168, with 23 (20 listed) maps & 2 folding tables, in good condition.
Following the American Revolution there was a burgeoning domestic production of cartography. Up to this point the market had been dominated by British published material with very little locally produced. One of the first American pioneers in this new market was Matthew Carey (1760-1839). Born in Dublin, Ireland, he was dropped at just a year old by his nurse and sustained lifelong injuries as a result. Possibly therefore he became a shy child and hid himself in books. From an early age he wanted to be a book printer and publisher. He wrote his first piece, against duelling, when he was 17 years old. He wrote a tract anonymously in support of the Catholics which brought about a reward of £40 for his arrest by a conservative group. He left for Paris where he was introduced to Benjamin Franklin. He worked with Franklin at his press in Passy before returning to Ireland where he set up a newspaper. Within a year, he had incurred the wrath of the government and was committed to Newgate Prison for a short while. With a new prosecution impending he fled following his release for America on 7 September 1784 by dressing as a woman. He arrived in Philadelphia with just 12 guineas to his name. He received a summons from General Lafayette who gave him $400. On 25 January 1785, he published the first issue of the ‘Pennsylvania Herald’ which supported the conservative party. It proved to be a success. However, it drew him in to a bitter dispute ending in a duel with Colonel Oswald, the editor of the ‘Independent Gazetteer’ in January 1786 which left him badly wounded. In the thigh. He was one of the founders of the ‘Columbia Magazine’ and then published the ‘American Museum’.Geographical texts were being published in the newly formed United States, the first was by Jedidiah Morse whose ‘American Geography’ in 1789 contained 2 maps. This was followed by Benjamin Workman’s ‘Elements of Geography’ with 3 maps. Collections of sea charts were available by Matthew Clark in 1790 and John Norman in 1791. The idea of a small America atlas or gazetteer was first demonstrated by Joseph Scott in 1795[94]. Carey prepared his own ‘American Pocket Atlas’ the following year. Issued with 19 maps of the United States there was a second edition in 1801. The edition of 1805 was expanded with a map to illustrate the Louisiana Purchase of 1803. In this 1814 edition three further new maps were introduced; those of the Upper Territories, Mississippi Territory and Missouri Territory. The latter incorporates information from the Lewis & Clark expedition (Schwartz). There does exist in the Library of Congress an extremely rare 1813 edition which may have suffered during the War of 1812. It contains the same maps, but only one other example could be traced at auction in the last 40 years, lacking all maps. The folding tables at the end include population statistics from the Census of 1810 and Export figures for each state.A good example with a fine frontier provenance. In 1818 Louisville was growing rapidly, within 10 years it would have a population of 7,000. It is interesting to see from the text that even in 1810 Kentucky had 2,000 distilleries! Provenance: with manuscript notation at the back of ‘Paul Jaminiere, Louisville Kentucky 5 December 1818’; Andrew Cumming, January 2000; Burden collection. Howes C137; Phillips 1372 & 4523; Ristow 151; Sabin 10856; Schwartz & Ehrenberg (1980) p. 231.
Stock number:9897.
$US 7500.00
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Imprint: Liege, c.1760
400 x 605 mm., early outline colour. With the lower right corner replaced just affecting the neat line supplied in facsimile, otherwise fine.
An EXTREMELY RARE MAP by A. Carront displaying the locations of battles and including some minor manuscript annotations around Konigstein north of Frankfurt. The map is engraved by I. Lovinsosse and a key below the title identifies battles won and lost in 1757 and 1758. A coloured key highlights the participants Austria, France, Russia, Prussia and Hanover. This is the only map attributed to Carront listed in Tooley (1999-2004).
Stock number:3695.
£ 525.00 ( approx. $US 683.23 )
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Imprint: London, 1824
1350 x 1050 mm., in full early wash colour, cut, dissected and laid on linen. With the original publishers marbled paper slipcase with paper title pasted on, with slight wear. The map in good condition.
The map is drawn to the scale of 8 miles to the inch. It is drawn with Greenwich as the meridian with all the roads well illustrated and the distance between towns marked. It was first published in 1818 with subsequent editions in 1823, 1824 offered here, 1826 and 1840. Provenance: manuscript ownership mark of Lady Ellenborough (1807-81), noted English aristocrat whose scandalous life included four husbands and numerous lovers. Fordham (1925) Cary p. 103-4.
Stock number:7301.
£ 750.00 ( approx. $US 976.05 )
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Imprint: London, July 1st., 1790
Edition: First Edition
Quarto (215 x 155 mm.), full contemporary calf, ornate gilt spine with red calf gilt title. With engraved title page, folding general map, foxed, map of the Turnpike Gates, both in early wash colour, Explanation and Advertisement, and 80 strip road maps on 40 double-page sheets all in early wash colour. Engraved throughout, with minor offsetting. Complete with original endpapers.
FIRST EDITION. John Cary (c.1754-1835) and descendants were possibly the most prolific publishers of cartography around the turn of the nineteenth century. Cary is noted for the clarity of detail in his maps and was the first to use the Greenwich meridian. In 1794 he was commissioned by the Postmaster-General to survey the roads of Great Britain. Cary had already published road books; indeed his first publication is one showing the roads between London and Falmouth, 1784. In 1790 Cary published his ‘Survey of the High Roads’ from London which contained twelve routes from the town and eighteen cross roads. All are in lovely early colour and display a wealth of information. It was particularly pointed out by Cary that the country houses along the route could be seen from certain vantage points which are marked out on the maps. It was reissued unaltered in 1799, in 1801 and again in 1810. There were no further editions. An example of the FIRST EDITION. Beresiner (1983) pp. 80-2; Fordham (1925) pp. 40-1; Fordham (1924) p. 40; Shirley (2004) T.Cary 4a.
Stock number:7657.
£ 995.00 ( approx. $US 1294.89 )
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Imprint: London, July 1st., 1790
Edition: First Edition
Quarto (255 x 175 mm.), full contemporary diced calf, ornate gilt panelled ruling, rebacked spine with gilt ruled compartments and gilt title, marbled endpapers. With engraved title page, folding general map, map of the Turnpike Gates with light margin soiling, both in early wash colour, Explanation and Advertisement, and 80 strip road maps on 40 double-page sheets all in early wash colour. Engraved throughout, with minor offsetting. Complete with original endpapers.
An example of the FIRST EDITION in LARGE PAPER. John Cary (c.1754-1835) and descendants were possibly the most prolific publishers of cartography around the turn of the nineteenth century. Cary is noted for the clarity of detail in his maps and was the first to use the Greenwich meridian. In 1794 he was commissioned by the Postmaster-General to survey the roads of Great Britain. Cary had already published road books; indeed his first publication is one showing the roads between London and Falmouth, 1784. In 1790 Cary published his ‘Survey of the High Roads’ from London which contained twelve routes from the town and eighteen cross roads. All the plates are in lovely early colour and display a wealth of information. It was particularly pointed out by Cary that the country houses along the route could be seen from certain vantage points which are marked out on the maps. It was reissued unaltered in 1799, in 1801 and again in 1810. There were no further editions. PROVENANCE: bookplate of Hooten Pagnell Hall, Yorkshire. Beresiner (1983) pp. 80-2; Fordham (1925) pp. 40-1; Fordham (1924) p. 40; Shirley (2004) T.Cary 4a.
Stock number:8831.
£ 1100.00 ( approx. $US 1431.54 )
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Imprint: London, July 1st., 1790
Edition: First Edition
Binding: Hardback
Quarto (215 x 155 mm.), contemporary half calf, with marbled paper boards, rebacked spine with blind ruled compartments and gilt title. With engraved title page, folding general map, map of the Turnpike Gates, both in early wash colour, Explanation and Advertisement leaf, and 80 strip road maps on 40 sheets all in early wash colour. Engraved throughout, with some very minor offsetting, complete with original endpapers, in good condition.
An example of the FIRST EDITION. John Cary (c.1754-1835) and descendants were possibly the most prolific publishers of cartography around the turn of the nineteenth century. Cary is noted for the clarity of detail in his maps and was the first to use the Greenwich meridian. In 1794, he was commissioned by the Postmaster-General to survey the roads of Great Britain. Cary had already published road books; indeed his first publication is one showing the roads between London and Falmouth in 1784. In 1790 Cary published his ‘Survey of the High Roads’ from London which contained twelve routes from the town and eighteen cross roads. All the plates are in lovely early colour and display a wealth of information. It was particularly pointed out by Cary that the country houses along the route could be seen from certain vantage points which are marked out on the maps. It was reissued unaltered in 1799, in 1801 and again in 1810. There were no further editions. Provenance: private English collection. Beresiner (1983) pp. 80-2; Fordham (1925) pp. 40-1; Fordham (1924) p. 40; Shirley (2004) T.Cary 4a.
Stock number:9212.
£ 1100.00 ( approx. $US 1431.54 )
Imprint: London, July 1st., 1790
Edition: First Edition
Binding: Hardback
Quarto (255 x 165 mm.), recent half calf, with marbled paper boards, spine with gilt title, in a recent solander box. With engraved title page, folding general map, map of the Turnpike Gates, both in early wash colour, Explanation and Advertisement leaf, and 80 strip road maps on 40 sheets all in early wash colour. Engraved throughout, with some very minor foxing, complete with original endpapers, in good condition.
An example of the FIRST EDITION on LARGE PAPER. John Cary (c.1754-1835) and descendants were possibly the most prolific publishers of cartography around the turn of the nineteenth century. Cary is noted for the clarity of detail in his maps and was the first to use the Greenwich meridian. In 1794, he was commissioned by the Postmaster-General to survey the roads of Great Britain. Cary had already published road books; indeed, his first publication is one showing the roads between London and Falmouth in 1784. In 1790 Cary published his ‘Survey of the High Roads’ from London which contained twelve routes from the town and eighteen cross roads. All the plates are in lovely early colour and display a wealth of information. It was particularly pointed out by Cary that the country houses along the route could be seen from certain vantage points which are marked out on the maps. It was reissued unaltered in 1799, in 1801 and again in 1810. There were no further editions. Provenance: manuscript inscription to title of 'R. Harries Jr'?; bookplate of Taylor inside front cover; Clarendon Books; private English collection. Beresiner (1983) pp. 80-2; Fordham (1925) pp. 40-1; Fordham (1924) p. 40; Shirley (2004) T.Cary 4a.
Stock number:9831.
£ 850.00 ( approx. $US 1106.19 )
Imprint: London, J. Cary, Engraver & Map-seller, No. 181 Strand, 1794-[1804]
Binding: Hardback
Quarto (325 x 250 mm.), later paper boards, spine largely worn. With engraved title, dedication, early outline coloured general map, Explanation and Scale and map in 76 sections, numbered to 81, in early outline colour, with pp. 14 list of roads and Index, pp. 88 general Index bound at the end, minor print offsetting, otherwise in good condition.
John Cary (1755-1835) and descendants were possibly the most prolific publishers of cartography around the turn of the nineteenth century. Cary is noted for the clarity of detail in his maps and was the first to use the Greenwich meridian. Cary was born in Warminster in 1755 to a prominent family. At fifteen he was apprenticed to the engraver William Palmer and made free in 1778. His very earliest works were engravings for or publications in partnership with others. Many of these suffered bankruptcy or other ill fortune. Undeterred he opened his own premises at 188 Strand taking over from the bookseller Samuel Hooper. His first sole publication was a very rare road book displaying the route from London to Falmouth published in 1784. At this point in time no fresh county atlases had been issued since the 'Large English Atlas' of the 1750s. Since then, between Robert Sayer and the Bowles family, now in the hands of Carington Bowles, the market had to make do with reissues of earlier works. However, during much of this period many counties had undergone fresh large-scale survey's, a number of which had been published. Both individuals were as Hodson stated 'now in their 60s, were wealthy, and furthermore quite uninterested in undertaking the compilation of a new English county atlas'. Having worked already on books to do with roads and canals Cary could see the rapidly transforming landscape and its use by the general public. The huge increase in the number of Turnpikes towards the end of the eighteenth century helped to ensure comfortable and relatively safe travel across the country.In 1787-89 Cary published the 'New and Correct English Atlas' which proved immediately successful. This work was first published as a separately issued wall map in eighty-one sheets in 1792. An example of it is found in the British Library (Maps *1130.2). Although strictly a wall map, it is best known through its publication in 1794 as an atlas with all eighty-one sheets bound in. The whole measures approximately 1775 x 2235 mm. and is drawn on a scale of 5 miles to the inch. It is also widely recognised as the first English atlas to be published using Greenwich as the Prime Meridian. This was agreed worldwide at an international conference in Washington in 1884. It was John Seller who, with his map of Hertfordshire published in 1676, first popularized the use of St. Paul’s Cathedral in London as the Meridian. Some individual maps had been published prior to 1794 using Greenwich, but none of the whole country.This map extends as far north as Edinburgh and gives extensive detail of the country at the time. It is dedicated to the Earl of Chesterfield and Lord Walsingham, the Post Masters General. An innovative feature he introduced was to place a letter at the exit point of a road from each map. This letter would correspond to that found on the neighbouring sheet. This was an early form of numbering the roads. Each sheet includes in the border a small square illustrating the numbers of the adjoining sheets for easy reference. The title, dedication, index map, explanation and scale bound at the beginning form sheets 80, 71, 62, 72 and 63 accordingly. All are to be found in the upper right of the whole. The top right sheet 81 is bound in order in the main part of the book.Special attention was paid to the roads and fourteen additional pages found here were added at a later stage. This example also includes the place list in 88 pages, its second state as first issued in 1804 according to Fordham. The last leaf of which includes an advert dated at the foot May 1804. A brief look at watermarks finds the latest being 1802. Fordham (1925) pp. 44-7; Smith, David (1988); Worms & Baynton-Williams (2011).
Stock number:9912.
£ 495.00 ( approx. $US 644.19 )
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Imprint: London, 1875
Quarto (235 x 155 mm.), full modern calf, spine with double gilt ruled compartments, black calf gilt title label, marbled endpapers. With title page, Index of maps, general map of England and Wales, 43 county maps on 44 plates (West Riding being on two plates) and both North and South Wales, 47 maps in total, all in early wash colour.
George Frederick Cruchley (1797-1880) had learned his trade with Aaron Arrowsmith and began to work for himself in 1823. His early days were concentrated on publishing maps of London but following the death of John Cary in 1834 he acquired much of the stock from the surviving heirs. Cruchley made lithographic transfers from the plates until he sold them all in 1877. Cruchley’s main marketing tool was to add to the original plates details of the railways, postal, telegraph and other useful information. These plates were originally published by Cary as the 'New and Correct English Atlas', 1809. Although quite probably acquired at an earlier date Cruchley does not appear to have made use of them until 1863 when he published the 'County Atlas of England & Wales'. There were further dated editions of 1864 and 1875 with undated issues in-between. This is an example of the last dated edition of George Cruchley’s 'County Atlas of England & Wales'. All editions are rare. Provenance: David Kingsley collection August 1989; private English collection. Beresiner pp. 93-5; Chubb 555; Nicholson (2003) ‘G. F. Cruchley and ‘Maps for the Million’, in IMCoS Journal 93 pp. 21-38; Smith, ‘George Frederick Cruchley, 1796-1880’, in 'The Map Collector' no. 49 pp. 16-22.
Stock number:9662.
£ 495.00 ( approx. $US 644.19 )
Imprint: London, G. F. Cruchley, Map Seller & Globe Maker, 81, Fleet Street, London, 1875
Binding: Hardback
Quarto (235 x 160 mm.), full contemporary cloth boards, blind ruled, rebacked preserving original spine, gilt double ruled compartments, gilt titles, recent endpapers. With title page, Index of maps, general map of England and Wales, 43 county maps on 44 plates (West Riding being on two plates) and both North and South Wales, 47 maps in total, all in early wash colour, the general map with small centrefold split, Norfolk with lower centre fold issue, Suffolk omitted, otherwise in good condition.
George Frederick Cruchley (1797-1880) had learned his trade with Aaron Arrowsmith and began to work for himself in 1823. His early days were concentrated on publishing maps of London but following the death of John Cary in 1834 he acquired much of the stock from the surviving heirs. Cruchley made lithographic transfers from the plates until he sold them all in 1877. Cruchley’s main marketing tool was to add to the original plates details of the railways, postal, telegraph and other useful information. These plates were originally published by Cary as the 'New and Correct English Atlas', 1809. Although quite probably acquired at an earlier date, Cruchley does not appear to have made use of them until 1863 when he published the 'County Atlas of England & Wales'. There were further editions of c.1864 and 1875. This is an example of the last dated edition of George Cruchley’s 'County Atlas of England & Wales'. All editions are rare. Provenance: private English collection. Beresiner pp. 93-5; Chubb 555; Nicholson (2003) ‘G. F. Cruchley and ‘Maps for the Million’, in IMCoS Journal 93 pp. 21-38; Smith, ‘George Frederick Cruchley, 1796-1880’, in 'The Map Collector' no. 49 pp. 16-22.
Stock number:9809.
£ 295.00 ( approx. $US 383.91 )
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Imprint: London, 1821
465 x 1015 mm., in full early wash colour, two sheets joined, in good condition.
This map was published in John Cary's 'New Universal Atlas' first published in 1808. John Cary (c.1754-1835) was one of the most successful map and globe publishers of the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries. Cary was the first map maker to use Greenwich as the meridian. The clarity of his style sets him apart from the competition. This is a later edition with the date in the imprint altered to 1821. Phillips 714 no. 37-8.
Stock number:9203.
£ 275.00 ( approx. $US 357.88 )
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Imprint: London, 1809
220 x 265 mm., early outline colour with wash coloured borders.
From 'Cary's New and Correct English Atlas'. John Cary (c.1754-1835) was one of the most successful map and globe publishers of the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries. The first of his important atlas contributions is the 'New and Correct English Atlas' first published in 1787. Cary was the first map maker to use Greenwich as the meridian. The clarity of his style sets him apart from the competition. The plates proved so popular that they had to be replaced with a fresh series which was published in 1809. Refer Hodson no. 285.
Stock number:9068.
£ 70.00 ( approx. $US 91.10 )
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Imprint: London, 1809-[21]
220 x 265 mm., early outline colour with wash coloured borders.
From 'Cary's New and Correct English Atlas'. John Cary (c.1754-1835) was one of the most successful map and globe publishers of the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries. The first of his important atlas contributions is the 'New and Correct English Atlas' first published in 1787. Cary was the first map maker to use Greenwich as the meridian. The clarity of his style sets him apart from the competition. The plates proved so popular that they had to be replaced with a fresh series which was published in 1809. Refer Hodson no. 285.
Stock number:9069.
£ 70.00 ( approx. $US 91.10 )
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Imprint: Rome, 1795
480 x 350 mm., recent wash colour, in good condition.
This map was published in Cassini's very rare three volume 'Nuovo Atlante Geografico Universale' 1792-1801 published in Rome by the Calcografia Camerale and appeared in the first volume dated 1792. Cassini (1745-c.1824) was a painter and engraver in Rome, this arguably being his finest publication. Phillips Atlases 670.
Stock number:4626.
£ 295.00 ( approx. $US 383.91 )
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Imprint: Paris, Charpentier rue S. Jacques au Coq, c.1740
345 x 520 mm., in good condition.
Etienne Charpentier (1707-92) was an engraver, publisher and print seller who established himself in 1736. He bagan by taking over the stock of the widow of Jean-Baptiste-Henri Bonnart. This is a fine engraving of the Chateau at Meudon
Stock number:8896.
£ 175.00 ( approx. $US 227.74 )
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