1859 books matched your search criteria. 20 books have been returned starting at 1.
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Imprint: London, Baldwin & Craddock, 1837
335 x 390 mm., in early outline colour.
A good detailed plan of the city of Brussels. An early edition and state of this map published by the firm of Baldwin and Craddock. With an inset plan of the surrounding environs there are profiles of notable buildings along the bottom.
Stock number:4664.
£ 50.00 ( approx. $US 65.07 )
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Imprint: London, Baldwin & Craddock, c.1844
335 x 390 mm., in early outline colour.
A good detailed plan of the city of Dresden. An early edition and state of this map published by the firm of Baldwin and Craddock. Originally issued in parts, this was first published as an atlas in 1844. It was arranged geographically with the fifty-one town plans at the end. There were to be at least ten other editions up to 1876. ‘Imago Mundi’ 46 pp. 151-67; Wardington sale lot 480.
Stock number:7777.
£ 55.00 ( approx. $US 71.58 )
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Imprint: London, Baldwin & Craddock, 1841
335 x 390 mm., in early outline colour.
A good detailed plan of the city of Hamburg. An early edition and state of this map published by the firm of Baldwin and Craddock. Originally issued in parts, this was first published as an atlas in 1844. It was arranged geographically with the fifty-one town plans at the end. There were to be at least ten other editions up to 1876. ‘Imago Mundi’ 46 pp. 151-67; Wardington sale lot 480.
Stock number:7776.
£ 65.00 ( approx. $US 84.59 )
Imprint: Leiden, c.1720
255 x 350 mm., in good condition.
A fine birds-eye view of Elbing in present day Poland. The town is shown spanning the Elbing River, bound by its fortifications. The buildings are displayed in great detail. In the foreground are some habitants pausing on the way into town. The view is by Pierre van der Aa (1659-1733), a prolific publisher particularly during the first part of the eighteenth century. By 1682 he was a bookseller and proprietor of an auction house. Amongst these publications is arguably the biggest atlas ever published, the 66 volume 'La Galerie Agreable du Monde'.
Stock number:9611.
£ 95.00 ( approx. $US 123.63 )
Imprint: Leiden, c.1725
290 x 365 mm., in good condition.
A map of Poland by Pierre van der Aa (1659-1733), a prolific publisher particularly during the first part of the eighteenth century. By 1682 he was a bookseller and proprietor of an auction house. Amongst these publications is arguably the biggest atlas ever published, the 66 volume 'La Galerie Agreable du Monde'.
Stock number:9721.
£ 150.00 ( approx. $US 195.21 )
Imprint: Leiden, c.1710
290 x 365 mm., in good condition.
A map centred on the town of Elbing, Poland, now known as Elblag just to the south east of Gdansk. It is by Pierre van der Aa (1659-1733), a prolific publisher particularly during the first part of the eighteenth century. By 1682 he was a bookseller and proprietor of an auction house. Amongst these publications is arguably the biggest atlas ever published, the 66 volume 'La Galerie Agreable du Monde'.
Stock number:9722.
£ 120.00 ( approx. $US 156.17 )
Imprint: Leiden, c.1730
Oblong quarto (190 x 240 mm.), full contemporary calf, joint to upper board weak, spine with raised bands, ornate gilt decorated compartments, gilt title and volume number. With three half titles to each part, part 4 contains 6 maps, 9 town plans and 39 plates; part 5 contains 2 maps and 34 plates; part 6 contains 8 maps, 4 plan and 16 plates, in total 114 plates consisting of 16 maps, 9 plans and 89 plates light water stain affecting about 6 plates, otherwise in good condition.
Pierre van der Aa (1659-1733) was born in Leiden, the son of a stone cutter or sculptor. By the time he was but nine years old he was already apprenticed to a bookseller. By 1682 he was the owner of a bookshop and auction. His output is so large that Koeman was sure that there were works yet to be identified. His printed catalogue of 1729 alludes to the fact that works could be made to order.As with many of his published books the source of the plates contained within is various. This work appears to be on the British Isles and to consist of 6 parts, the last three of which are present here. The 16 maps were those first published in Jan Jansson’s ‘Atlas Minor’ of 1648. Here the fundamental difference is the titles are now in French. The 9 plans were all first published in ‘Britannia Magna sive Anglia’ by Rutger Hermannides. The main difference here is the addition of a key above and some additional toponyms on each plate. The 89 views, largely birds-eye images of country houses, are all from James Beeverall’s ‘Les Delices de la Grand Bretagne et L’Irlande’ first published in 1707 and expanded in 1727. Beyond this work we now very little about Beeverall. The illustrations are derived from Loggan, Kip, Slezer and others and are engraved by Jan Goeree (1670-1731). First published in 1707 this second edition is greatly expanded and updated. Despite many images being derived from earlier published works they are by no means slavish copies. Many bear additional decoration of features. Provenance: bookplate of Sir William Maxwell of Monreith pasted inside upper cover. Adams (1967) 20; Brunet (1860-80) 1735; Burden (1992) ‘Berkshire Town Plans’ pp. 10-11; Deadman & Brooks (2015) pp. 22 & 24; Frostick (2011) no. 15; Koeman (1967-70) I pp. 1-30, II Me 204; Lowndes (1864) 146; Upcott (1968) p. xxiv.
Stock number:9775.
£ 1000.00 ( approx. $US 1301.40 )
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Imprint: London, 1832
24 x 32.5 cms., early wash colour.
An attractive scene of the famous Chambord Chateau on the Loire. Published by the famous firm of Ackerman and printed by Engelmann. Not located in Abbey.
Stock number:3269.
$US 125.00
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Imprint: London, 1 January 1819
325 x 435 mm., aquatint engraving in superb early wash colour, two small fox marks in lower margin, otherwise in excellent condition with good margins.
This superb aquatint is one of a pair of Richmond printed by Rudolph Ackermann and is taken from near the Duke of Buccleuch property. The engraving is the work of Thomas Sutherland and was from a drawing by John Gendell. Gendall (1790-1865), born near Exeter, displayed early promise as an artist and was sent to Sir John Soane in London. It was through him that he was introduced to Ackermann. No bibliographical reference to be found. Mallalieu (1986).
Stock number:7737.
£ 595.00 ( approx. $US 774.33 )
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Imprint: London, 1766
Edition: First Edition
Binding: Hardback
Folio (300 x 195 mm.), pp. 4, (243-4) in good condition.
The rare first printing of the repeal of the notorious STAMP ACT of 1765 [5 Geo III Cap.12] which brought such indignation from the American Colonies and ultimately was key to the eventual Declaration of Independence and the American Revolution. The British government had taken on huge debts to finance the French and Indian War and felt that some of the cost should be born by the colonies. The Act placed a tax on all legal and commercial almanacs, cards, dice, newspapers, pamphlets and papers in the American Colonies. It was immediately denounced with the now famous phrase "taxation without representation". The British Government soon realised the error of their ways and in the following session repealed the Act. The political damage was however already done. The ESTC records just three copies. Church 1060; ESTC N56896.
Stock number:8056.
$US 1795.00
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Imprint: London, 1836-[72]
61.5 x 89 cm.Uncoloured chart, with minor creasing along centrefold, and bottom margin.Some age toneing.
Surveyed by Comdr Haines and Assistants. Inset of Aden Anchorage, also 2 insets of the land as seen from the sea.
Stock number:2994.
£ 250.00 ( approx. $US 325.35 )
Imprint: Stockholm, Sammandragen och graverad af E. Akerland pa A Wiborgs forlag, 1818
345 x 420 mm., early wash colour, small foxmark right margin, otherwise in very good condition.
Over the years Australia has been known by different appellations. The most enigmatic of them was Ulimaroa. This map is a later Swedish edition of Daniel Djuberg's original published in Stockholm in 1780. The name was first used by Djurberg (1744-1834) in 1776. A member of the Cosmographical Society in Uppsala he wanted to give the land an indigenous name, instead of the European ones placed on it to date. 'Ulimaroa' is a Maori term originally found in Hawkesworth's edition of Captain James Cook's voyage. Some believe the Maori were actually referring to Grand Terre in New Caledonia. The Austrian mapmaker Franz Anton Schraembl in 1789 published a map using the same name as did Franz Johann Joseph von Reilly.It is highly likely that this map was published in response to Carl Jonas Love Almqvist's novel entitled 'Parjumour Saga ifran Nya Holland' published in Stockholm, 1817. It is the first Swedish novel set in Australia. Erik Akerlund [Akerland] (1754-1835) was a Swedish chartmaker and engraver. He was born in Stockholm and studied engraving there. He joined the globe making firm of Fredrik Akrel where he worked on the series of charts for Johann Nordenankar from 1787. He took over publication of Anders Akerman's 'Atlas Juvenilis' in the early 1800s.Australia is here named as 'Nya Holland eller Ulimoroa'. The map appears to exist in two states, this being the first. A second state has been identified in which 'Forbalttrad 1831' has been added to the title cartouche. Further names have been added to New Zealand and Australia where the Blue Ridge Mountains are present. Ginsberg (2009) pp. 143-4; Tent, Jan & Geraghty, Paul (2012) 'Where in the World is Ulimaroa', in 'Journal of Pacific History' volume 47; Tooley 'One Hundred Foreign Maps of Australia' no. 48, pl. 155; Tooley's 'DIctionary' (1999-2004).
Stock number:9660.
£ 750.00 ( approx. $US 976.05 )
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Imprint: London, Mount, John & Page, Thomas, c.1764
555 x 825 mm., printed on fine thick paper and in very good condition.
This is one of the very few works published by the firm of Mount and Page that was not part of the extensive 'English Pilot' series. It was entitled "A compleat set of new charts on thirty-eight large plates: containing an accurate survey of the coast of Portugal and the Mediterranean Sea". The title page was engraved by J. Larkin and it seems likely on stylistic grounds that the cartouches at least on the individual maps are also by him. NMM 405; Shirley BL M.Alag 1a no. 16.
Stock number:4442.
£ 350.00 ( approx. $US 455.49 )
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Imprint: Augsburg, 1608
545 x 405 mm., in fine condition.
An engraved emblematic double page plate with the family tree of the rulers of Bavaria. A fine view of the town of Heidelberg is at the bottom of the plate. It is from Antonio Albizzi's 'Principum Christianorum Stemmata', a popular work of the day. It was engraved by David Custodis. The family tree of the local Royal and notable family is laid out. Graesse I 58; Shirley G.Albi 1a.
Stock number:4512.
£ 220.00 ( approx. $US 286.31 )
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Imprint: Augsburg, 1608
540 x 390 mm., in fine condition.
An engraved emblematic double page plate with the family tree of the rulers of Lorraine. A view of the town of Blanmond is at the bottom of the plate. It is from Antonio Albizzi's 'Principum Christianorum Stemmata', a popular work of the day. It was engraved by David Custodis. The family tree of the local Royal and notable family is laid out. Graesse I 58; Shirley G.Albi 1a no. 23.
Stock number:4511.
£ 145.00 ( approx. $US 188.70 )
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Imprint: Augsburg, 1608
400 x 245 mm., in fine condition.
An engraved emblematic plate with the arms of Copenhagen, Denmark, whose Latin name is Hafnia. A view of the town is at the bottom of the plate. It was published in 'Principum Christianorum Stemmata' by Antonio Albizzi (1547-1626) of Florence, a popular work of the day. It was engraved by David Custodis. The family tree of the local Royal or notable family is laid out. Graesse I 58; Shirley G.Albi 1a no. 20.
Stock number:4395.
£ 165.00 ( approx. $US 214.73 )
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Imprint: Augsburg, 1608
510 x 390 mm., in fine condition.
An engraved emblematic double page plate of the family tree of the rulers of the region of Toledo in central Spain. A fine view of the town of Toledo is at the bottom of the plate. It is from Antonio Albizzi's 'Principum Christianorum Stemmata', a popular work of the day. It was engraved by David Custodis. The family tree of the local Royal and notable family is laid out. Graesse I 58; Shirley G.Albi 1a.
Stock number:4690.
£ 175.00 ( approx. $US 227.74 )
Imprint: London, 1624
250 x 340 mm., with wide margins, with some repair to double folds as might be expected, light fold along the centre, otherwise in good condition.
AN EXCEEDINGLY RARE MAP in its FIRST STATE. 'The 'Encouragement to Colonies', and its map, were published to promote Sir William Alexander's colonial desires in America. These attempts in 'New Scotlande' as he named it, or Nova Scotia, were ultimately unsuccessful. Unreasonably dismissed by many, this map is of great importance. Following the destruction of the French settlements in the Bay of Fundy by Captain Samuel Argall in 1613, the English began to take an interest in the region. In November 1620, the Council for New England was founded with control of the Americas between 40 and 48 degrees north latitude, stretching from the Atlantic to the Pacific Ocean. Some forty patentees received land. In 1621 William Alexander, first Earl of Stirling (1567-1640) and a court favourite, obtained from James I (James VI of Scotland) a Royal Charter for the area east of the Ste. Croix River and the Acadian peninsula. In 1623 a meeting of the Council reduced this number to just twenty, whose names are recorded on this map for the first time. Following the unnamed war with France in 1627-29, and the Treaty of St. Germain in 1632, the English relinquished all claims to the territory that is now New Brunswick and Nova Scotia.The map reflects Alexander's Scottish interests, with many placenames having their origin in that country. Newfoundland incorporates some of John Mason's as yet unpublished cartography, particularly of the west coast. The French colonies of Tadousac and Kebec are depicted, but none of those in Acadia. What we believe to be Prince Edward Island is recorded. This was noticeably lacking from earlier maps of the area. There are two states, the first being extremely rare. In 1625 the plate was used for Samuel Purchas' 'Pilgrimes', appearing in volume four with the page numbers on the map. A second edition of 'An Encouragement to Colonies' was published in 1625, and later in 1630 with a new title, 'The mapp and description of New-England'. This was published using the unsold sheets from the previous editions; hence the map still appears in its first state. The author has not located an example with the second state present' (Burden). References: Burden (1996-2007) no. 208; Church (1907) nos. 400, 401a & 414; Kershaw (1993-98) pp. 84-5; O’Dea (1971) fig. 13; Phillips (1901) p. 465; Sabin (1868) nos. 739-40, 66686 & 91853; Sotheby’s, Ham House sale 30 May 1938 lot 5 (1624 edition); Suárez (1992) pp. 131-3.
Stock number:9881.
$US 15000.00
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Imprint: Amsterdam, c.1689-[c.1721]
500 x 590 mm., early outline colour with full wash to the cartouche, a very attractive example in very good condition.
A very attractive map of England and Wales with a superb early wash coloured cartouche. Although the map is undated Shirley speculates that it was issued at around the time of the crowning of William and Mary as they are featured in the ornate title cartouche designed by Philip Tiedman and engraved by Gelliam van den Gouwen. Although Shirley identifies two known states there are now four recorded. This example is not recorded in Shirley's. It bears the Covens and Mortier imprint along the bottome as described in Shirley's state 2 however Allard's name remains in the cartouche. Provenance: Loeb-Larocque 1978, private English collection. refer Shirley Allard 3.
Stock number:8235.
£ 475.00 ( approx. $US 618.16 )
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Imprint: London, Andrew Dury and William Herbert, 1768
485 x 600 mm., with original folds still in very good condition.
This detailed plan of Canterbury by John Andrews and Matthew Wren is separately published by Andrew Dury and William Herbert, but is more usually found with Andrews and Dury's twenty-five sheet large scale map of the county of Kent published a year later in 1769. At the bottom outside the neatline is an advertisement for the large scale map announcing that it will shortly be published on a scale of two inches to the mile. This plan is drawn to the large scale of about 175 feet to the inch. John Andrews (fl.1766-98) was a geographer, surveyor, engraver and mapseller in London who is particularly well known for his fine collaborations with Andrew Dury. Matthew Wren had already worked with Andrews on plans of Hertford and St. Albans. The finished product was published jointly by Andrews and William Herbert. Worms & Baynton-Williams (2011).
Stock number:7221.
£ 650.00 ( approx. $US 845.91 )
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