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Imprint: London, 1626
90 x 120 mm., with brown margin edges clear of the image, otherwise in good condition.
The contribution of John Bill (fl.1591-d.1630) to cartography was limited to two works, this one and the English edition of Abraham Ortelius' atlas in folio entitled 'Theatre of the World' co-published with John Norton. Bill was a noted bookseller who was apprenticed to John Norton in 1592. His talent in Latin soon caught the attention of Sir Thomas Bodley who from about 1599 commissioned him to travel and acquire books on his behalf. He started his own business in 1603 and became the Kings printer in 1604. The maps are reductions of those by Christopher Saxton and are the earliest of the English counties to have longitude and latitude marked. The Prime Meridian used is the Azores and the engraver is still unknown. Estimates of only 200 copies being printed have been cited. The map of Cornwall is cartographically improved with the peninsula being orientated more correctly on a north-east to south-west line than found on Saxton or Speed's maps. Provenance: private English collection. Beresiner (1983) p. 54; Quixley (1966) 9; Shirley (2004) T.Camd 3a; Skelton (1970) 15; STC 4527; Worms & Baynton-Williams (2011).
Stock number:9244.
£ 400.00 ( approx. $US 520.56 )
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Imprint: Amsterdam, 1638
400 x 800 mm., early outline colour, two sheets joined, as issued, in good condition.
This large two-sheet map of the Alsace region of present day France is based on the work of Gerard Mercator. It first appeared in the 'Atlas Novus' just before Willem Blaeu's death in 1638. It covers the region from Granville and Sarburg in the north and from Basel to Landaw in the south. It includes also the Rhine River. It is oriented to the west, the whole being decorated with an attractive title cartouche bearing two figures and a coast of arms. French text on verso. Koeman I Bl 139; Van der Krogt, P. (Atlantes) 2520:2.
Stock number:6141.
£ 275.00 ( approx. $US 357.88 )
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Imprint: Amsterdam, c.1645
380 x 500 mm., in superb early wash colour with GILT HIGHLIGHTS. Good condition.
An attractive early map of Andalusia and the south coast of Spain centred on the present day 'Costa del Sol'. The coastline extends from Faro in Portugal to Albufera in the east. The cities of Seville and Cordoba are highlighted with gold and the coats of arms bear gilded crowns also. Joan Blaeu (1598-1673) is one of the most famous of the Dutch cartographers and this example from the 'Atlas Novus' is with French text to the verso. Van der Krogt, P. (Atlantes) 6110:2.
Stock number:6143.
£ 325.00 ( approx. $US 422.96 )
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Imprint: Amsterdam, 1634-[59]
385 x 495 mm., early outline colour, with Spanish text, with tear to the upper margin repaired, in good condition.
The Blaeu firm's first topographical atlas appeared in 1630 in one volume and was gradually expanded. By 1640 it was in three volumes and contained just 4 British Isles maps. His chief rival, the Hondius-Jansson atlas contained 18 maps. Both joined a race to make their fourth volumes a complete atlas of the British Isles. Blaeu was first, publishing his magnificent work in 1645. Of the general maps contained Blaeu was also the first to produce one of England and Wales first appearing in 1634. The map is derived from that of John Speed although hear lacking the figures along the sides as befitted the new style being set by the Dutch mapmakers. It is however beautifully decorated with the coats of arms of Great Britain and Ireland along with an ornate scale and title cartouche. There is known to exist a proof state of this map, so technically this is a second state, with Spanish text as issued in 1659. Koeman (1967-70) Bl. 5 no. 107 p. 89; Shirley (1991) no. 440; Van der Krogt, P. (Atlantes) 5100:2.
Stock number:7231.
£ 260.00 ( approx. $US 338.36 )
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Imprint: Amsterdam, 1645-[62]
410 x 520 mm., in early wash colour with extensive additional gilt and silver decoration, in good condition.
This map of Bedfordshire and Buckinghamshire is by Joan Blaeu (1598-1673), arguably the most famous of the Dutch cartographers. Here it is offered in EXTRA FINE COLOURING WITH EXTENSIVE USE OF GOLD. During the seventeenth century the Dutch held a dominant position in the production of high quality atlases. One of the more visual aspects of this was the reputation of its colourists. At its peak certain colourists began to produce work of an exceptional nature. Arguably the most famous of these was Dirk Jansz. Van Santen (1637/38-1708). Goedings made a study of his work in 1992. Although we are not stating that this is an example of his colouring many of his traits are repeated in this work. Goedings reports that “Fontaine Verwey is of the opinion that Van Santen coloured atlases in three different ways: colouring without gold; gold just for the legends, cartouches, coats of-arms and decorative motifs of a map; and gold on the maps themselves, for frontiers, cities, etc.”. About the only trait not found in this collection of maps is that of extending the foreground or background of the cartouches.The style of colouring is described by Goedings as “signified by rich and exotic colour combinations, added elements such as flowers to clothing, marbling to masonry”. He “applied transparent and opaque colours at the same time in both mixed and pure tints. He often painted the whole surface of the map or illustration, transforming the graphic light and dark contrasts into colour … He applied his characteristic shiny varnish, this had the effect of brightening the colour, frequently making use of the same colour progression … His use of colour was much freer than that of other colourists. The tone of the colours was made to complement the gold he used so lavishly. In his best work two other costly pigments, ultramarine and carmine are found in large amounts, mostly set against gold. Ultramarine and gold were a very popular colour combination in the seventeenth century … Moreover, he added elements to the design, such as patterns and flower motifs to the clothing of figures, veining of stones or map frontier lines … Van Santen applied transparent and opaque colours at the same time in both mixed and pure tints … Above all things Van Santen distinguished himself from his contemporaries in his lavish use of gold which he applied meticulously. On maps he applied gold not only to the decorative motifs, the legends, cartouches and coats-of-arms, but he also worked it decoratively into the map itself.”Goedings goes on to describe Van Santens use of 'shell gold'. “Gold leaf was available in small booklets of approximately 5 x 5 centimetres containing a number of very thin sheets of gold. A 17th century method of making shell gold from gold leaf was to grind it on a rubbing stone along with honey, water and salt and then to wash it in very clean water. The small amount of liquid gold was then placed in a shell and vinegar was added to it. The vinegar assured a good consistency … Needless to say, this high quality shell gold was very expensive and must have been paid for by the customers of large, prestigious projects, as in the case of Van der Hem. Seventeenth century instructions for applying gold to paper have been preserved and give an indication of the complexity of this treatment. In all likelihood, Van Santen had developed his own method for applying gold to paper … As far as one can tell with the naked eye, he first put on a yellow base before using a brush to apply the gold. Scientific tests might make it possible to determine more about Van Santen's characteristic use of material, particularly about his use of gold. This could make it easier to identify his work.” All of these traits can be seen on these particular examples, however we cannot say who the colourist is.Joan Blaeu's father Willem established his firm in 1599 as instrument and globe makers. He went on to produce some of the highest quality atlases ever published. This example is from the rare final Spanish text issue of the 'Atlas Major' whose production was interrupted by the great fire at the Blaeu publishing house in 1672. Chambers no. 11; Goedings, Truusje (1992) 'Master Colourist Dirk Jansz. Van Santen 1637/38-1708'; Koeman Bl 60A p. 281; Van der Krogt, P. (Atlantes) 5270:2 & 5271:2; Skelton (1970) 28 & 73; Wyatt no. 10.
Stock number:8853.
£ 495.00 ( approx. $US 644.19 )
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Imprint: Amsterdam, 1645.
41 x 53 cms., in magnificent early outline colour with full wash coloured cartouches.
From the 'Novus Atlas'. Joan Blaeu (1598-1673) is one of the most famous of the Dutch cartographers. The fourth volume of his atlas focused on England and Wales. Blaeu established his firm in 1599 as instrument and globe makers. He went on to produce some of the highest quality atlases ever published. The lower right depicts a pleasant scene of a gentleman using a pair of dividers presumably on a map held up by a cherub. Skelton 28; Van der Krogt, P. (Atlantes) 5560:2.
Stock number:3851.
£ 450.00 ( approx. $US 585.63 )
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Imprint: Amsterdam, 1645
410 x 530 mm., early wash colour, slight lower centrefold split, repaired, very minor paper crease, otherwise in good condition.
This map is generally considered one of the most decorative maps of the British Isles ever published. It is derived from that of John Speed first published in 1611 (offered elsewhere in this catalogue), that by Joan Blaeu is usually in the most magnificent original colour. It depicts Britain at the time of the Saxon Kingdoms displaying their boundaries and coats of arms. The seven kingdoms are Northumbria, Mercia, East Anglia, Essex, Kent, Sussex and Wessex. With an ornate title cartouche, the map is adorned by superb side panels illustrating the history of the Anglo-Saxon period. Blaeu’s first topographical atlas appeared in 1630 in one volume and was gradually expanded. By 1640 the ‘Atlas Novus’ as it was then entitled was in three volumes and contained just 4 British Isles maps. His chief rival, the Hondius-Jansson atlas contained 18 maps. Both joined in a race to make their fourth volumes a complete atlas of the British Isles. Blaeu was first, publishing his magnificent work in 1645, one year before that of Jansson’s. The work of Blaeu set a standard of design, beauty and quality that arguably has never been surpassed. The most desirable map in the volume is this one offered here. Shirley (1991) 549; Krogt (1997-2010) 5000H:2B; Skelton (1970) 28.
Stock number:7717.
£ 1850.00 ( approx. $US 2407.59 )
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Imprint: Amsterdam, 1645
38 x 50 cm. Early outline wash colour. Slight split to upper centrefold. Some paper thinning. Some ink staines to text on reverse.
ex 'Atlas Novus'.
Stock number:2654.
£ 250.00 ( approx. $US 325.35 )
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Imprint: Amsterdam, 1645-[48]
420 x 525 mm., in early outline colour, in good condition.
Willem Blaeu established the firm in 1599 as instrument and globe makers. His first topographical atlas appeared in 1630 in one volume and was gradually expanded. By 1640 the 'Novus Atlas' by his Joan Blaeu (1598-1673) was in three volumes and contained just 4 British Isles maps. His chief rival, the Hondius-Jansson atlas contained 18 maps. Both joined a race to make their fourth volumes a complete atlas of the British Isles. Blaeu was first, publishing his magnificent work in 1645, one year before that of Jansson’s. The work of Blaeu set a standard of design, beauty and quality that arguably has never been surpassed. He went on to produce some of the highest quality atlases ever published. This map is one of the most desirable in the atlas covering the county of Cambridgeshire. The Arms of Cambridge University Colleges are along the sides along with their dates of founding. An ornate title cartouche bears the Royal Arms to its left. This is an early example from 1648 with German text. Koeman Bl47D; Skelton 28 & 44; Van der Krogt, P. (Atlantes) 5300:2.
Stock number:9009.
£ 575.00 ( approx. $US 748.30 )
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Imprint: Amsterdam, 1645
380 x 500 mm. in early outline colour, in good condition.
Joan Blaeu (1598-1673) is one of the most famous of the Dutch cartographers. The fourth volume of his atlas focused on England and Wales. Blaeu established his firm in 1599 as instrument and globe makers. He went on to produce some of the highest quality atlases ever published. This fine map of Kent has French text on the verso.
Stock number:8160.
£ 575.00 ( approx. $US 748.30 )
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Imprint: Amsterdam, 1645-[62]
385 x 505 mm., in SUPERB early outline colour with extensive additional gilt decoration and blue wash to the sea, with large margins, in very good condition.
This map of Cardiganshire is by Joan Blaeu (1598-1673), arguably the most famous of the Dutch cartographers. Here it is offered in EXTRA FINE COLOURING WITH EXTENSIVE USE OF GOLD. During the seventeenth century the Dutch held a dominant position in the production of high quality atlases. One of the more visual aspects of this was the reputation of its colourists. At its peak certain colourists began to produce work of an exceptional nature. Arguably the most famous of these was Dirk Jansz. Van Santen (1637/38-1708). Goedings made a study of his work in 1992. Although we are not stating that this is an example of his colouring many of his traits are repeated in this work. Goedings reports that “Fontaine Verwey is of the opinion that Van Santen coloured atlases in three different ways: colouring without gold; gold just for the legends, cartouches, coats of-arms and decorative motifs of a map; and gold on the maps themselves, for frontiers, cities, etc.”. About the only trait not found in this collection of maps is that of extending the foreground or background of the cartouches.The style of colouring is described by Goedings as “signified by rich and exotic colour combinations, added elements such as flowers to clothing, marbling to masonry”. He “applied transparent and opaque colours at the same time in both mixed and pure tints. He often painted the whole surface of the map or illustration, transforming the graphic light and dark contrasts into colour … He applied his characteristic shiny varnish, this had the effect of brightening the colour, frequently making use of the same colour progression … His use of colour was much freer than that of other colourists. The tone of the colours was made to complement the gold he used so lavishly. In his best work two other costly pigments, ultramarine and carmine are found in large amounts, mostly set against gold. Ultramarine and gold were a very popular colour combination in the seventeenth century … Moreover, he added elements to the design, such as patterns and flower motifs to the clothing of figures, veining of stones or map frontier lines … Van Santen applied transparent and opaque colours at the same time in both mixed and pure tints … Above all things Van Santen distinguished himself from his contemporaries in his lavish use of gold which he applied meticulously. On maps he applied gold not only to the decorative motifs, the legends, cartouches and coats-of-arms, but he also worked it decoratively into the map itself.”Goedings goes on to describe Van Santens use of 'shell gold'. “Gold leaf was available in small booklets of approximately 5 x 5 centimetres containing a number of very thin sheets of gold. A 17th century method of making shell gold from gold leaf was to grind it on a rubbing stone along with honey, water and salt and then to wash it in very clean water. The small amount of liquid gold was then placed in a shell and vinegar was added to it. The vinegar assured a good consistency … Needless to say, this high quality shell gold was very expensive and must have been paid for by the customers of large, prestigious projects, as in the case of Van der Hem. Seventeenth century instructions for applying gold to paper have been preserved and give an indication of the complexity of this treatment. In all likelihood, Van Santen had developed his own method for applying gold to paper … As far as one can tell with the naked eye, he first put on a yellow base before using a brush to apply the gold. Scientific tests might make it possible to determine more about Van Santen's characteristic use of material, particularly about his use of gold. This could make it easier to identify his work.” All of these traits can be seen on these particular examples, however we cannot say who the colourist is.Joan Blaeu's father Willem established his firm in 1599 as instrument and globe makers. He went on to produce some of the highest quality atlases ever published. This example is from the rare final Spanish text issue of the 'Atlas Major' whose production was interrupted by the great fire at the Blaeu publishing house in 1672. Booth (1977) pp. 44-8; Goedings, Truusje (1992) 'Master Colourist Dirk Jansz. Van Santen 1637/38-1708'; Koeman Bl 60A p. 281; Van der Krogt, P. (Atlantes) 5540:2; Skelton (1970) 28 & 73.
Stock number:8876.
£ 450.00 ( approx. $US 585.63 )
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Imprint: Amsterdam, 1645
385 x 505 mm., early outline colour in good condition.
Joan Blaeu (1598-1673) is one of the most famous of the Dutch cartographers. The fourth volume of his 'Novus Atlas' first published in 1645 focused on England and Wales. Blaeu established his firm in 1599 as instrument and globe makers. He went on to produce some of the highest quality atlases ever published. This very decorative map of Cardigan is from the French text edition of 1645, it was re-issued in 1646 and 1648 with the same text setting. Booth (1977) pp. 44-8; Koeman Bl 42A 342; Van der Krogt, P. (Atlantes) 5540:2; Skelton (1970) 28.
Stock number:9002.
£ 250.00 ( approx. $US 325.35 )
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Imprint: Amsterdam, 1645-[62]
380 x 505 mm., in SUPERB early wash colour with extensive additional gilt and silver decoration and blue wash to the sea, in very good condition.
This map of Cheshire is by Joan Blaeu (1598-1673), arguably the most famous of the Dutch cartographers. Here it is offered in EXTRA FINE COLOURING WITH EXTENSIVE USE OF GOLD. During the seventeenth century the Dutch held a dominant position in the production of high quality atlases. One of the more visual aspects of this was the reputation of its colourists. At its peak certain colourists began to produce work of an exceptional nature. Arguably the most famous of these was Dirk Jansz. Van Santen (1637/38-1708). Goedings made a study of his work in 1992. Although we are not stating that this is an example of his colouring many of his traits are repeated in this work. Goedings reports that “Fontaine Verwey is of the opinion that Van Santen coloured atlases in three different ways: colouring without gold; gold just for the legends, cartouches, coats of-arms and decorative motifs of a map; and gold on the maps themselves, for frontiers, cities, etc.”. About the only trait not found in this collection of maps is that of extending the foreground or background of the cartouches.The style of colouring is described by Goedings as “signified by rich and exotic colour combinations, added elements such as flowers to clothing, marbling to masonry”. He “applied transparent and opaque colours at the same time in both mixed and pure tints. He often painted the whole surface of the map or illustration, transforming the graphic light and dark contrasts into colour … He applied his characteristic shiny varnish, this had the effect of brightening the colour, frequently making use of the same colour progression … His use of colour was much freer than that of other colourists. The tone of the colours was made to complement the gold he used so lavishly. In his best work two other costly pigments, ultramarine and carmine are found in large amounts, mostly set against gold. Ultramarine and gold were a very popular colour combination in the seventeenth century … Moreover, he added elements to the design, such as patterns and flower motifs to the clothing of figures, veining of stones or map frontier lines … Van Santen applied transparent and opaque colours at the same time in both mixed and pure tints … Above all things Van Santen distinguished himself from his contemporaries in his lavish use of gold which he applied meticulously. On maps he applied gold not only to the decorative motifs, the legends, cartouches and coats-of-arms, but he also worked it decoratively into the map itself.”Goedings goes on to describe Van Santens use of 'shell gold'. “Gold leaf was available in small booklets of approximately 5 x 5 centimetres containing a number of very thin sheets of gold. A 17th century method of making shell gold from gold leaf was to grind it on a rubbing stone along with honey, water and salt and then to wash it in very clean water. The small amount of liquid gold was then placed in a shell and vinegar was added to it. The vinegar assured a good consistency … Needless to say, this high quality shell gold was very expensive and must have been paid for by the customers of large, prestigious projects, as in the case of Van der Hem. Seventeenth century instructions for applying gold to paper have been preserved and give an indication of the complexity of this treatment. In all likelihood, Van Santen had developed his own method for applying gold to paper … As far as one can tell with the naked eye, he first put on a yellow base before using a brush to apply the gold. Scientific tests might make it possible to determine more about Van Santen's characteristic use of material, particularly about his use of gold. This could make it easier to identify his work.” All of these traits can be seen on these particular examples, however we cannot say who the colourist is.Joan Blaeu's father Willem established his firm in 1599 as instrument and globe makers. He went on to produce some of the highest quality atlases ever published. This example is from the rare final Spanish text issue of the 'Atlas Major' whose production was interrupted by the great fire at the Blaeu publishing house in 1672. Goedings, Truusje (1992) 'Master Colourist Dirk Jansz. Van Santen 1637/38-1708'; Koeman Bl 60A p. 281; Van der Krogt, P. (Atlantes) 5360:2; Skelton (1970) 28 & 73.
Stock number:8854.
£ 1250.00 ( approx. $US 1626.75 )
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Imprint: Amsterdam, c.1650
410 x 500 mm., fine early outline colour with Dutch text to the verso, in good condition.
Joan Blaeu (1598-1673) is one of the most famous of the Dutch cartographers. The fourth volume of his 'Novus Atlas' focused on England and Wales. Willem Blaeu established the firm in 1599 as instrument and globe makers. He went on to produce some of the highest quality atlases ever published. Skelton 28; Van der Krogt, P. (Atlantes) 5315:2.
Stock number:5551.
£ 350.00 ( approx. $US 455.49 )
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Imprint: Amsterdam, c.1650
380 x 500 mm., early outline colour with Latin text to the verso, minor paper crease upper centrefold otherwise in good condition.
Joan Blaeu (1598-1673) is one of the most famous of the Dutch cartographers. The fourth volume of his 'Novus Atlas' focused on England and Wales. Willem Blaeu established the firm in 1599 as instrument and globe makers. He went on to produce some of the highest quality atlases ever published. Skelton 28; Van der Krogt, P. (Atlantes) 5355:2.
Stock number:5718.
£ 375.00 ( approx. $US 488.02 )
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Imprint: Amsterdam, c.1650
380 x 500 mm., early outline colour with Dutch text to the verso, with generous margins and in good condition.
Joan Blaeu (1598-1673) is one of the most famous of the Dutch cartographers. The fourth volume of his 'Novus Atlas' focused on England and Wales. Willem Blaeu established the firm in 1599 as instrument and globe makers. He went on to produce some of the highest quality atlases ever published. Beaton pp. 25-7; Skelton 28; Van der Krogt, P. (Atlantes) 5240:2.
Stock number:8033.
£ 550.00 ( approx. $US 715.77 )
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Imprint: Amsterdam, 1645-[62]
380 x 500 mm., in SUPERB early outline colour with extensive additional gilt and silver decoration and blue wash to the sea, in good condition.
This map of Dorset is by Joan Blaeu (1598-1673), arguably the most famous of the Dutch cartographers. Here it is offered in EXTRA FINE COLOURING WITH EXTENSIVE USE OF GOLD. During the seventeenth century the Dutch held a dominant position in the production of high quality atlases. One of the more visual aspects of this was the reputation of its colourists. At its peak certain colourists began to produce work of an exceptional nature. Arguably the most famous of these was Dirk Jansz. Van Santen (1637/38-1708). Goedings made a study of his work in 1992. Although we are not stating that this is an example of his colouring many of his traits are repeated in this work. Goedings reports that “Fontaine Verwey is of the opinion that Van Santen coloured atlases in three different ways: colouring without gold; gold just for the legends, cartouches, coats of-arms and decorative motifs of a map; and gold on the maps themselves, for frontiers, cities, etc.”. About the only trait not found in this collection of maps is that of extending the foreground or background of the cartouches.The style of colouring is described by Goedings as “signified by rich and exotic colour combinations, added elements such as flowers to clothing, marbling to masonry”. He “applied transparent and opaque colours at the same time in both mixed and pure tints. He often painted the whole surface of the map or illustration, transforming the graphic light and dark contrasts into colour … He applied his characteristic shiny varnish, this had the effect of brightening the colour, frequently making use of the same colour progression … His use of colour was much freer than that of other colourists. The tone of the colours was made to complement the gold he used so lavishly. In his best work two other costly pigments, ultramarine and carmine are found in large amounts, mostly set against gold. Ultramarine and gold were a very popular colour combination in the seventeenth century … Moreover, he added elements to the design, such as patterns and flower motifs to the clothing of figures, veining of stones or map frontier lines … Van Santen applied transparent and opaque colours at the same time in both mixed and pure tints … Above all things Van Santen distinguished himself from his contemporaries in his lavish use of gold which he applied meticulously. On maps he applied gold not only to the decorative motifs, the legends, cartouches and coats-of-arms, but he also worked it decoratively into the map itself.”Goedings goes on to describe Van Santens use of 'shell gold'. “Gold leaf was available in small booklets of approximately 5 x 5 centimetres containing a number of very thin sheets of gold. A 17th century method of making shell gold from gold leaf was to grind it on a rubbing stone along with honey, water and salt and then to wash it in very clean water. The small amount of liquid gold was then placed in a shell and vinegar was added to it. The vinegar assured a good consistency … Needless to say, this high quality shell gold was very expensive and must have been paid for by the customers of large, prestigious projects, as in the case of Van der Hem. Seventeenth century instructions for applying gold to paper have been preserved and give an indication of the complexity of this treatment. In all likelihood, Van Santen had developed his own method for applying gold to paper … As far as one can tell with the naked eye, he first put on a yellow base before using a brush to apply the gold. Scientific tests might make it possible to determine more about Van Santen's characteristic use of material, particularly about his use of gold. This could make it easier to identify his work.” All of these traits can be seen on these particular examples, however we cannot say who the colourist is.Joan Blaeu's father Willem established his firm in 1599 as instrument and globe makers. He went on to produce some of the highest quality atlases ever published. This example is from the rare final Spanish text issue of the 'Atlas Major' whose production was interrupted by the great fire at the Blaeu publishing house in 1672. Beaton pp. 25-7; Goedings, Truusje (1992) 'Master Colourist Dirk Jansz. Van Santen 1637/38-1708'; Koeman Bl 60A p. 281; Van der Krogt, P. (Atlantes) 5240:2; Skelton (1970) 28 & 73.
Stock number:8857.
£ 1100.00 ( approx. $US 1431.54 )
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Imprint: Amsterdam, 1645
380 x 510 mm., early outline colour in good condition.
Joan Blaeu (1598-1673) is one of the most famous of the Dutch cartographers. The fourth volume of his 'Novus Atlas' focused on England and Wales. Blaeu established his firm in 1599 as instrument and globe makers. He went on to produce some of the highest quality atlases ever published. This very decorative map of Brecon is from the French text edition of 1645, it was re-issued in 1646 and 1648 with the same text setting. Booth (1977) pp. 44-8; Koeman 42A 338; Skelton 28; Van der Krogt, P. (Atlantes) 5525:2.
Stock number:9001.
£ 195.00 ( approx. $US 253.77 )
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Imprint: Amsterdam, 1645-[62]
390 x 505 mm., in SUPERB early wash colour with extensive additional gilt and silver decoration and blue wash to the sea, in good condition.
This map of Cornwall is by Joan Blaeu (1598-1673), arguably the most famous of the Dutch cartographers. Here it is offered in EXTRA FINE COLOURING WITH EXTENSIVE USE OF GOLD. During the seventeenth century the Dutch held a dominant position in the production of high quality atlases. One of the more visual aspects of this was the reputation of its colourists. At its peak certain colourists began to produce work of an exceptional nature. Arguably the most famous of these was Dirk Jansz. Van Santen (1637/38-1708). Goedings made a study of his work in 1992. Although we are not stating that this is an example of his colouring many of his traits are repeated in this work. Goedings reports that “Fontaine Verwey is of the opinion that Van Santen coloured atlases in three different ways: colouring without gold; gold just for the legends, cartouches, coats of-arms and decorative motifs of a map; and gold on the maps themselves, for frontiers, cities, etc.”. About the only trait not found in this collection of maps is that of extending the foreground or background of the cartouches.The style of colouring is described by Goedings as “signified by rich and exotic colour combinations, added elements such as flowers to clothing, marbling to masonry”. He “applied transparent and opaque colours at the same time in both mixed and pure tints. He often painted the whole surface of the map or illustration, transforming the graphic light and dark contrasts into colour … He applied his characteristic shiny varnish, this had the effect of brightening the colour, frequently making use of the same colour progression … His use of colour was much freer than that of other colourists. The tone of the colours was made to complement the gold he used so lavishly. In his best work two other costly pigments, ultramarine and carmine are found in large amounts, mostly set against gold. Ultramarine and gold were a very popular colour combination in the seventeenth century … Moreover, he added elements to the design, such as patterns and flower motifs to the clothing of figures, veining of stones or map frontier lines … Van Santen applied transparent and opaque colours at the same time in both mixed and pure tints … Above all things Van Santen distinguished himself from his contemporaries in his lavish use of gold which he applied meticulously. On maps he applied gold not only to the decorative motifs, the legends, cartouches and coats-of-arms, but he also worked it decoratively into the map itself.”Goedings goes on to describe Van Santens use of 'shell gold'. “Gold leaf was available in small booklets of approximately 5 x 5 centimetres containing a number of very thin sheets of gold. A 17th century method of making shell gold from gold leaf was to grind it on a rubbing stone along with honey, water and salt and then to wash it in very clean water. The small amount of liquid gold was then placed in a shell and vinegar was added to it. The vinegar assured a good consistency … Needless to say, this high quality shell gold was very expensive and must have been paid for by the customers of large, prestigious projects, as in the case of Van der Hem. Seventeenth century instructions for applying gold to paper have been preserved and give an indication of the complexity of this treatment. In all likelihood, Van Santen had developed his own method for applying gold to paper … As far as one can tell with the naked eye, he first put on a yellow base before using a brush to apply the gold. Scientific tests might make it possible to determine more about Van Santen's characteristic use of material, particularly about his use of gold. This could make it easier to identify his work.” All of these traits can be seen on these particular examples, however we cannot say who the colourist is.Joan Blaeu's father Willem established his firm in 1599 as instrument and globe makers. He went on to produce some of the highest quality atlases ever published. This example is from the rare final Spanish text issue of the 'Atlas Major' whose production was interrupted by the great fire at the Blaeu publishing house in 1672. Upper left are the arms of the Dukes and Earls of the county. The cartouche is flanked by fish and bars of tin, the most important trading commodities of the county. Goedings, Truusje (1992) 'Master Colourist Dirk Jansz. Van Santen 1637/38-1708'; Koeman Bl 60A p. 281; Van der Krogt, P. (Atlantes) 5255:2; Quixley 12; Skelton (1970) 28 & 73.
Stock number:8855.
£ 1250.00 ( approx. $US 1626.75 )
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Imprint: Amsterdam, 1645-[46]
39 x 50 cms., early outline colour
ex 'Novus Atlas'. Joan Blaeu (1598-1673) is one of the most famous of the Dutch cartographers. The fourth volume of his atlas focused on England and Wales. Blaeu established his firm in 1599 as instrument and globe makers. He went on to produce some of the highest quality atlases ever published. From the Dutch text edition of 1646 issued one year after initial publication. Skelton 28
Stock number:3495.
£ 500.00 ( approx. $US 650.70 )
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