2095 books matched your search criteria. 20 books have been returned starting at 61.
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Imprint: London, Robert Sayer and Thomas Jefferys, 1768
Four uncut sheets each 490 x 630 mm., in early outline colour, with deckled edges in EXCELLENT CONDITION.
This is the first map of the county of Durham to be produced at a scale of one inch to the mile and the only one issued in the eighteenth century. It was surveyed by Lieutenant Andrew Armstrong and his son Mostyn John Armstrong; both were cartographers although only the son published any atlases. At the time Andrew Armstrong described himself as "Lieut. on half pay from the 32nd Regt." Their focus was on Scottish related material with the notable exception of the large scale county surveys of the neighbouring county of Northumberland which would be published the following year and two further of Lincolnshire in 1779 and Rutland in 1780. It was engraved and published by Thomas Jefferys. There are three states all published in rapid succession in the same year this being the third state with the imprint of both Robert Sayer and Thomas Jefferys. An Explanation upper right helps to identify the Market Towns, Parishes, Churches, Seats, Farms or Cottages, Parks, Turnpike Roads, 'Inclosed' partial and open roads and Roman points of interest. Also indicated are Coal Pits and Lead Mines along with natural features such as Hills, Woods and Parks etc. A fine plan of the town of Durham appears lower left accompanied by a compass rose and encapsulated by an ornate border. A nearby note records the fact that the latitude figures used were taken by Professor Hornsby in 1765. The longitude were deduced from the solar eclipse of 1766 and compared with those made at London, Sherborn and Oxford. The map is dedicated to Henry Earl of Darlington, the Lord Lieutenant of the county. The title appears in an ornate cartouche upper right with a mining scene. To its right is a model of the Bases and Triangles used to triangulate the county. All issues are rare, particularly this one. Provenance: private English collection. Harley, Brian ‘The Re-Mapping of England, 1750-1800’ in Imago Mundi 19 pp. 56 & 63; Rodger (1972) 101; Worms & Baynton-Williams (2011).
Stock number:7216.
£ 1950.00 ( approx. $US 2537.73 )
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Imprint: London, 1854
62 x 50 cms., early outline colour, two small marks in the left hand margin not effecting the image
This map is another of Arrowsmith's usual high quality production. From the 'London Atlas'
Stock number:3171.
£ 110.00 ( approx. $US 143.15 )
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Imprint: London, 1843
630 x 515 mm., early outline colour, in good condition.
With a further inset entitled 'The Lower Course of the River Niger as far as it was ascended in the ...'. The voyage was known as the Niger expedition and was undertaken at the auspices of the British Government. It was undertaken by British missionary groups. It suffered from a high mortality due to disease. The island of St. Thomas is just shown at the bottom.
Stock number:7790.
£ 95.00 ( approx. $US 123.63 )
Imprint: Vienna, 1843
Edition: First Edition
520 x 750 mm., early outline colour, dissected and backed on linen, with original publisher's marbled paper slipcase, in good condition.
A fascinating detailed map of the River Danube. An inset above the plan of Constantinople details the vessels which ply the waters of the River. The map underlines all the steamboat 'Pyroscaphe' or route points along the river. This is an example of the first edition of 1843. The firm of Artaria & Co, was fuonded by Italian cousins Francesco and Carlo in 1770. Provenance: Bernard Shapero 2003; private collection of Rodney Shirley. Tooley's Dictionary.
Stock number:9432.
£ 195.00 ( approx. $US 253.77 )
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Imprint: London, W. Mears, at the Lamb with-out Temple-Bar, and J. Hooke, at the Flower-de-Luce against St. Dunstan's Church in Fleetstreet, 1723
Edition: First Edition
Inscription: Signed, Inscribed Or Annotated
Octavo, three volumes (200 x 125 mm. each), full contemporary mottled calf, gilt panelled, ornate spine with raised bands, gilt ruled compartments with ornate designs, with gilt volume numbers and remains of red calf title label to 1 volume, lightly worn, otherwise in good condition. pp. (2), cxxviii + 194; (2), 195-580 [2]; (2), 428, with large folding county map incorporating view of Windsor Castle in volume 1; genealogical tables paginated within the text of volume 3, of which 11 are folding; engraved vignette on p. 331 of volume 3, woodcut title vignettes and tailpieces. In good condition.
The first published history of the county of Berkshire. Elias Ashmole (1617–1692) was an astrologer and antiquary and appointed to the College of Arms as Windsor Herald of Arms in Ordinary in 1660. Ashmole is however better known as an antiquary. He catalogued the Tradescant collection, the earliest recorded catalogue of what would become known as an English ‘Cabinet of Curiosities’. At about the same time he met William Dugdale the antiquary. Ashmole’s own notable collection of curiosities were given to Oxford University on the condition that they house them appropriately. In 1683 the Ashmolean Museum opened, it was the first public museum in modern Europe. In the 1660s he began collecting information for a history of the county of Berkshire but it was not to be published during his lifetime. The first edition was in 1719, this is the revised second edition with pp. 516-517 of vol. 2 correctly numbered. The superb folding etched map by Wenceslaus Hollar was engraved for John Overton in 1666. It is a copy of that by John Speed in 1611 reduced in scale. Hollar’s distinctive etching style shows most in the prospect of Windsor Castle (which contains Hollar’s etched signature) and the illustrations of the dress of the Knights of the Garter. John Overton (1640-1713) was the son of a bookseller Henry Overton and married the daughter of the publisher William Garrett. He was a printseller who in 1665 acquired the stock of Peter Stent who died of the plague that year and who had arguably the largest collection of prints on the market at the time. Amongst this stock he found twelve copper plates of the English counties by William Smith. These formed the nucleus of a set of maps of the English Counties. Overton commissioned the engraving of some new plates for missing counties; amongst them is this one of Berkshire. Those counties which Overton could not provide from his own stock were supplied by the acquired maps of Speed, Blaeu or Jansson. These county atlases were an English version of a rich seam of similar Dutch composite atlases published from the mid-seventeenth century. They are exceedingly rare surviving in just five known examples. Provenance: Anderson p. 50; Burden 14.ii; ESTC T140220; Pennington (1982) no. 658.ii (not recognising this issue); Skelton (1970) 89; refer Upcott p. 9.
Stock number:8661.
£ 780.00 ( approx. $US 1015.09 )
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Imprint: London, 1745
235 x 355 mm., with folds as published in lower right margin extended after removal by binder, in good condition.
This plan of the island of Goree includes two views below of the Cape Verde Islands found just to the west. Goree is now known as Dakar in Senegal. From Thomas Astley, 'A Collection of Voyages and Travels' and engraved by Isaac Basire. Shirley BL G.Astl 1a no. 20.
Stock number:4860.
£ 70.00 ( approx. $US 91.10 )
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Imprint: London, 1745
240 x 360 mm., in fine condition.
The Island of Goree is a small island of just 45 acres (0.2 sq. km.) located only 2 km at sea from the main harbour of Dakar, Senegal. It was first occupied by the Portuguese c.1450 as a post to enable further southward exploration down the coast of Africa. In turn it became a Dutch, French and English possession. This plan of the island of Goree includes two views below of the Cape Verde Islands found just to the west. It is from the publisher Thomas Astley's "A New General Collection of Voyages and Travels" published in 1745. Archambault, 'The Map Collector' 45 pp. 28-30; Shirley Atlases in the BL G.Astl 1a no. 20.
Stock number:4485.
£ 125.00 ( approx. $US 162.67 )
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Imprint: London, E. Curll, 1718-[19]
255 x 360 mm., with folds as issued in good condition.
John Aubrey (1626-97) was as antiquary and natural philosopher. He is perhaps best known for his work 'Brief Lives', made up of a series of short biographical chapters. He was also an early archaeologist who recorded many monuments in England for the first time. He started studies on the natural history of Wiltshire and Surrey, neither were completed. Published posthumously in five volumes between 1718 and 1719 the work included this map. It is the first history of the county to be published. The map is dedicated to Sir John Fellowes. Upcott III p. 1207.
Stock number:9058.
£ 195.00 ( approx. $US 253.77 )
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Imprint: Marseilles, 1746
Inscription: Signed, Inscribed Or Annotated
290 x 450 mm., in very good condition.
The "Recueil de Plusieurs Plans des Ports et Rades ... de la Mer Mediterranee" contained numerous plans of the Mediterranean ports and harbours. The plates are all signed "par iacques Ayrouard pilote real avec privilege du Roy grave par louis Corne". They show their engraver is one Louis Corne. The place of publication is unknown but presumed here to be Marseille, the home of a few similar works. The work is dedicated to Jean Frederick Phelypeaux Comte de Maurepas who was the Minister of the Navy to Louis XV. About Ayrouard surprisingly little is known other than his referral in the book to being a navigator with the French Royal Navy. This particular chart is of the bay and port of Palma, Majorca, in the Balearic Islands. NMM 206; Phillips 7862; Shirley Atlases in the BL M.Ayr 1a.
Stock number:4577.
£ 350.00 ( approx. $US 455.49 )
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Imprint: London, Roadway Timetables, Bookings & Publications Ltd,, [1932]
1010 x 1265 mm., colour printed lithographic map with blue edged border all the way around, with original folds in very good condition.
An unusual Quad-Royal poster of the London Underground in that it is laid onto a map of Central London at the scale of just under 7 inches to the mile. A note in the upper margin states 'Southgate extension of the Piccadilly Railway from Finsbury Park is now under construction ...', this helps in dating it as the Southgate station opened on 13 March 1933. In 1933 the iconic Underground design by Harry Beck was first published. In this the lines of the Underground are colour coded and do not detract from the street plan itself. Red circles denote the stations which are reminiscent of the earlier design introduced in 1908. Stingemore style lines are shown in different colours.It extends from Willesden Green top left, Drayton Park and Holloway Road top right, Oval lower right, Hammersmith and Walham Green lower left and London Bridge and the Oval stations lower right. The imprints in the lower margin read from left to right 'Drawn by G.W. Bacon & Co., Ltd.', centre 'Copyright map by Roadway Timetables, Bookings & Publications Ltd, Roadway Corner, Warwick Street, London W.1.', and to the right 'Litho - J.Weiner Ltd, London W.C.1.' David Leboff and Tim Demuth, 'No need to ask! : Early maps of London's Underground Railways', p. 76 has a full page illustration of this map (lacking the blue border), with details on the opposite page.
Stock number:9018.
£ 2950.00 ( approx. $US 3839.13 )
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Imprint: London, 1742-[c.46]
Octavo (170 x 105 mm.), full modern blind panelled mottled calf. With raised bands, ornate blind decoration to compartments, red calf gilt titled label to spine. Engraved double page title with minor crease, engraved double page dedication and 53 double page plates numbered 1-50 which include 7 tables, 6 general and 40 county maps. Engraved throughout and in fine CONTEMPORARY FULL WASH COLOUR. Some centrefold restoration to the chart of England and Wales, some loss to margin of Cornwall reinstated, Lancashire and Lincolnshire restored and some minor centrefold splits repaired, otherwise a reasonable example in a rare form.
This is an example of the 'Chorographia Britannia' in full early wash colour. First published in 1742 this is a later edition bearing the revised imprint of John Clark on the title page. He had joined Charles Hitch and William Henry Toms in the ownership of the atlas by November 1745 when a newly worded advert was placed in the 'Evening Post'. Clark died in April 1746 and was succeeded by his wife Anne. It is the first pocket size English county atlas published in the eighteenth century. It is surprising it took so long for one to be published considering the runaway success of the 'Britannia Depicta' of 1720. Two similar atlases were to be published shortly after, the 'Geographia Magnae Britanniae' by Thomas Osborne, 1748, and the 'Small English Atlas' by Thomas Kitchin and Thomas Jefferys, 1749. Chubb 173; Hodson I no. 192; Shirley BL T.Bad 1d.
Stock number:5060.
£ 1500.00 ( approx. $US 1952.10 )
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Imprint: London, 1742-[45]
Edition: First Edition
Binding: Hardback
Octavo (165 x 110 mm.), modern half calf, red cloth boards, raised bands to the spine blind ruled, with gilt calf title label. Lacking engraved title. Dedication, 5 tables, 4 general and 42 county maps and 2 plates of rates for Hackney carriages etc. engraved throughout. Some titles trimmed at the top. Some minor centrefold splitting, last couple of leaves a little brittle at the edges with some loss, some light foxing, otherwise in acceptable condition.
Thomas Badeslade (fl.1719-1745) was a surveyor and engineer who was involved in many schemes to improve the waterways. He was also an established author and in 1742 he had William Henry Toms engrave a series of maps from his draughts and publish them as the 'Chorographia Britanniae'. It is the first pocket size English county atlas published in the eighteenth century. It is surprising that it took so long considering the runaway success of the 'Britannia Depicta' of 1720. This is the first edition to introduce two plates number 49 and 50 of the Hackney coaches. Provenance: ownership inscription of G. Francis dated Oct 31st 1859, private collection of Rodney Shirley. Beresiner (1983) pp. 49-50; ESTC T153842; Hodson (1984-97) no. 191; Shirley (2004) T.Bad 1c; Worms & Baynton-Williams (2011).
Stock number:7212.
£ 750.00 ( approx. $US 976.05 )
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Imprint: London, 1742-[c.46]
Binding: Hardback
Octavo (170 x 110 mm.), full contemporary calf, gilt panelled boards, rebacked preserving original label with ribbed spine ruled with gilt. Engraved double page title, engraved double page dedication and 53 double page plates numbered 1-50 which include 7 tables, 6 general and 40 county maps. Engraved throughout and in full contemporary wash colour. Lower centrefold split to Shropshire, otherwise in good condition.
This is a lovely example of the 'Chorographia Britannia' in full early wash colour. First published in 1742 this is a later edition bearing the revised imprint of John Clark on the title page. He had joined Charles Hitch and William Henry Toms in the ownership of the atlas by November 1745, when a newly worded advert was placed in the 'Evening Post'. Clark died in April 1746 and was succeeded by his wife Anne. It is the first pocket size English county atlas published in the eighteenth century. It is surprising it took so long for one to be published considering the runaway success of the 'Britannia Depicta' of 1720. Provenance: G. F. Smith on inside front cover; private English collection. Chubb (1927) 173; Hodson (1984-97) no. 192; Worms & Baynton-Williams (2011).
Stock number:7300.
£ 1950.00 ( approx. $US 2537.73 )
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Imprint: London, 1742
Edition: First Edition
Octavo (160 x 100 mm.), full recent calf, ribbed spine with gilt date and green calf gilt title label. With engraved title, Dedication, 5 tables, 4 general and 42 county maps, engraved throughout. Dedication with small tear repaired upper edge, some cleaning and regarding, otherwise in acceptable condition.
Thomas Badeslade (fl.1719-1745) was a surveyor and engineer who was involved in many schemes to improve the waterways. He was also an established author and in 1742 he had William Henry Toms engrave a series of maps from his draughts and publish them as the 'Chorographia Britanniae'. It is the first pocket size English county atlas published in the eighteenth century. It is surprising that it took so long considering the runaway success of the 'Britannia Depicta' of 1720. The first edition of the atlas is found in four variants and was on sale for only a short period of time. Within two or three months a new edition was published.The second issue placed plate numbers '8' and '9' on the two where it was omitted. This example is one of only three identified of the extremely rare third issue of the first edition of the 'Chorographia Britanniae'. Following the immediate addition of plate numbers to those of Cambridgeshire and Cheshire which had been omitted on publication Toms ordered the addition of the price to the end of the imprint on the title page. Even though all evidence shows the price of the atlas was 6 shillings from the start ‘Price Bound 5s’ was added. The error was picked up immediately and corrected for the fourth and last variant of the first edition. Hodson could only find one example of this rare issue, that in the Royal Geographical Society (Ford 146). One other in a private collection is known to me and then this third example was uncovered. In the two privately held ones the price has been inked over to show 6s. Provenance: private English collection. Beresiner (1983) pp. 49-50; Chubb (1927) 170; ESTC T165385; Hodson (1984-97) no. 188 (atlas C p. 164); refer Shirley (2004) T.Bad 1a; Worms & Baynton-Williams (2011).
Stock number:9211.
£ 950.00 ( approx. $US 1236.33 )
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Imprint: London, 1741
14.5 x 15 cm. Early wash colour
ex 'Chorographia Britanniae'. Thomas Badeslade (fl.1719-45) was an engineer and surveyor. Thomas was also an author and draughtsman who drew maps of the Fens as part of his work of waterway improvements. His only atlas is the 'Chorographia Britanniae' issued in 1742 published by W H Toms who engraved the maps. There were later editions to c.1749. Skelton-Hodson 188.
Stock number:2567.
£ 55.00 ( approx. $US 71.58 )
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Imprint: Liverpool, 1824-5
Binding: Hardback
Quarto (280 x 205 mm.), contemporary half calf, paper boards bearing original ornate title, gilt ruled and titled spine. With 12 maps of which 4 are folding and 8 town plans, plus 2 folding tables. Light wear but otherwise in good condition.
This collection contains a fine large folding map of the county by W. Wales with attractive vignette of Liverpool. A similar sized plan of Liverpool by Neele & Son. The two tables of the distances of the principal towns of England and the 'Population Returns of England' drawn from the 1821 census. Single sheet town plans of Preston, Lancaster, Ashton under Lime, Stockport, Bolton, Blackburn, Rochdale and Oldham, a large folding of Manchester, general map of England and Wales. Provenance: Bow Windows Bookshop.
Stock number:7293.
£ 320.00 ( approx. $US 416.45 )
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Imprint: London, c.1790
180 x 265 mm., in good condition.
This fine copper plate engraving of the city of Dublin is from Thomas Bankes' 'New and Complete System of Geography'.
Stock number:7636.
£ 50.00 ( approx. $US 65.07 )
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Imprint: London, George Virtue, c.1842
Binding: Hardback
Quarto (285 x 230 mm.), contemporary half calf, cloth boards, blind ruled, gilt raised bands, blind ruled, with gilt title, light wear. With 50 engraved maps and 11 plates. Some water staining to first three leaves, some fox marks, the maps with unusually decent margins.
First issue of the ‘Enlarged, improved and adapted’ B. B. Woodward edition with plans of both Oxford and Cambridge. Thomas Moule (1784-1851) was a noted historian, map seller and publisher. His finest work is the ‘English Counties Delineated’ first published in 1837 following its issue in parts from May 1830 to the spring of 1836. The maps are considered the most attractive of all the later English county atlases. They are all highly decorative and bear a series of vignettes. The publisher was George Virtue & Co. who used the same beautiful plates in his publication of the Rev. James Barclay’s ‘Complete and Universal English Dictionary’ c.1842. A new title page was engraved soon after entitled Barclay’s ‘Universal English Dictionary’ as offered here. The early issues were ‘Newly Revised by Henry W. Dewhurst, Esq: F.E.S.L.’ Soon after they were revised by B. B. Woodward as here. Provenance: Thomas Powell of Birmingham dated June 8th 1878. Beresiner (1983) pp. 160-3; Not in Chubb.
Stock number:6326.
£ 795.00 ( approx. $US 1034.61 )
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Imprint: London, 1797
680 x 490 mm., in good condition.
Sir John Barrow (1764-1848) was an English explorer and the Private Secretary to Lord Macartney whilst he was Ambassador to China. He would later become a founder member and vice-president to the Royal Geographical Society. The official account of Lord Macartney's voyage to the Qianlong Emperor of China 1792-94 was published as Sir George Staunton's 'An Authentic Account of an Embassy from the King of Great Britain to the Emperor of China'. Staunton (1737-1801) was a diplomat accompanying the voyage. This large chart displays the route from Canton to Nanjin (Nankin). Cordier Sinica 2381-3; Tooley's Dictionary.
Stock number:6291.
£ 250.00 ( approx. $US 325.35 )
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Imprint: London, 1950
Binding: Hardback
560 x 820 mm., printed colour, large folding map backed on linen within its publishers end boards complete with printed title, in very good condition.
John Bartholomew (1805-61) was the first of the family name to join a business founded in 1784. The period of the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries represented the height of the companies influence. The main influence of growth in the business was John George Bartholomew (1831-93). He was the inventor of layer colouring, first introduced in his maps in 1888. One of the firms first significant productions was the ‘Imperial Map of England and Wales’ derived from the Ordnance Survey. The map is a typically detailed one engraved on steel. It is drawn on a scale of half an inch to the mile. Beresiner ‘British County Maps’ pp. 52-3.
Stock number:8095.
£ 95.00 ( approx. $US 123.63 )
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